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Photo & some advice on 3 of the shown components

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KevinAlaska

New Member
If you insist on using a blinking led you should connect a 1 Watt
zener diode accross the capacitor's terminals like in this circuit.

I will try that circuit out and see what happens. :)

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska

P.S. That 'countinous' circuit is a night light and does have a switch inline on it. not sure if that means anything in this whole thing.
 

mneary

New Member
I did write blinking, my mistake. I really meant the circuit in Kevin's original post.

This is a good time to repeat from on1aag's schematic a few easily overlooked details: The mylar capacitor should be X2 class (self healing) and the 1M resistor should be rated for 200V or more. The series 10R resistor is a good idea to limit surges, and it should be flameproof.

As for how many LEDs will work from the same circuit, quite a few, at least a dozen. The LEDs should be in SERIES. The circuit is current regulated.
 

KevinAlaska

New Member

From what I can see with the naked eye (fox whistle!), it very well could be. It mentioned an IC inside the LED and from looking in I can see one. I didn't see it before but I do now.

3829-550029608_066e3d25ab_o.jpg


I read back a bit that I might have posted this in the wrong listing in here, if so I am sorry.

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska

PS... how can I post these images with just the thumbnail instead of the whole big annoying thing, like I have been doing?
 

KevinAlaska

New Member
Thank you mneary! :)

This is a learning curve for me. I had a year of electronics about 17 years ago in college. Okay maybe 18 years ago. I lied. I didn't want you to think I was old so I subtracted a year. :p

Thank you for the idea of about how many LEDs could be lined up. I was hoping for about 6 to 10. somewhere in there. I can't wait to get an order in and try some of these things out on my own.

Seems like one of my two problems is coming to an end. Just need to finish the one I need sooner.. heh.. figures.

Thank you for all the help... EVERYONE! if this post is not finished please PLEASE let me know. I am a willing learner.

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska
 

on1aag

New Member
Hi Kevin,

The circuit diagram is a little different.

kevin-gif.13214


As for how many leds you can connect, start with eight or ten.

3830-10_1163005113.GIF


3831-54_1163004912.JPG


As you can see my desk is not on fire. :D

on1aag.
 
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mneary

New Member
Don't feel too old... I've been employed (not counting neighbors' TVs) in electronics since 1968. Before that it was (is) my hobby. If you count free jobs, it was 1959.
 

KevinAlaska

New Member
on1aag and mneary... thank you so much for this. I am now going to check out the balance of my little personal hobby credit card that is used for my silly projects and check my balance. :)

thank you again everyone for the good help... Good folk on here. Only other friendly forums I have seen this friendly are on the linux forums. :)

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska

Cheers!
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
on1aag said:
Hi Kevin,

You better change the circuit a little bit, otherwise the 100 µF / 16 V
capacitor will produce a hissing sound followed by a loud bang. :D

on1aag.

hi on1aag,

I felt that 100uF cap was in the wrong place and should be across the 100R and LED,
Kevin assures me he has traced the pcb track and it like his drawing.

I was going to ask him to post a picture of the track side of the pcb.
Can you please do that Kevin???

Regards
 

KevinAlaska

New Member
Sure I have a link here... I flipped the back image of the PCB so you can just look at it and compare with out having to do it in your head. I hope that makes it easier. I can see the possibility of that might being over kill because you I am sure have more experience looking at PCBs then me, so you are just used to it.

Anyhow.. here it is. I do hope it helps! :)

https://farm1.static.flickr.com/203/551405755_79d2158482_b.jpg

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
KevinAlaska said:
Sure I have a link here... I flipped the back image of the PCB so you can just look at it and compare with out having to do it in your head. I hope that makes it easier. I can see the possibility of that might being over kill because you I am sure have more experience looking at PCBs then me, so you are just used to it.

Anyhow.. here it is. I do hope it helps! :)

https://farm1.static.flickr.com/203/551405755_79d2158482_b.jpg

Sincerely,

Kevin in Alaska


Hi Kevin,

The 100uF cap is across the +/- terminals of the FWB, as I would expect, refer on1aag drawing. Fig #2

EDIT: Never connect the mains supply without the 100R and LED in circuit!!!

Watch out for those turtles, they make nice soup!

Remember my concerns over no mains isolation on the pcb.
 
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KevinAlaska

New Member
Wow!!! I have looked at that thing a number of times and for longer then I would hate to say on here. For I have no dignity and with that it will yet take me lower... heh.. jk. But I had to look at it and look at it. ... and ... you get the picture. heh. crazy

thank you for that mistake correction.

Did the flipped picture help. I want a survey from you all. . .
1-Did the flipped image help &
2-Is looking at a PCB something that is just too natural?

THank you again

Sincerly,

Kevin in Alaska
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
KevinAlaska said:
Wow!!! I have looked at that thing a number of times and for longer then I would hate to say on here. For I have no dignity and with that it will yet take me lower... heh.. jk. But I had to look at it and look at it. ... and ... you get the picture. heh. crazy

thank you for that mistake correction.

Did the flipped picture help. I want a survey from you all. . .
1-Did the flipped image help 'Yes, its a good idea to show both sides of the pcb'

2-Is looking at a PCB something that is just too natural? 'its just a matter of practice'

THank you again

Sincerly,
Kevin in Alaska

Lets know how it goes.
 

Hero999

Banned
on1aag said:
As for how many leds you can connect, start with eight or ten..

The maximum number of LEDs you can connect depends on their forward voltage, the maximum voltage rating of the 100:mu:F capacitor and the mains voltage (which won't make much difference unless you're want to connect over 10 LEDs).

In this case the capacitor is rated for 16V.

The rainbow LED probably has a maximum forward voltage of maybe 3.5V, therefore the maximum number of LEDs you can connect is 4, if you want more LEDs then use a higher voltage capacitor.
 
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mneary

New Member
Did the flipped picture help. I want a survey from you all. . .
1-Did the flipped image help &
2-Is looking at a PCB something that is just too natural?
1- The reverse side image helps a lot.
2- Understanding a PCB by looking is a skill that I acquired gradually over the time of about 10 years. Most of the time this was the only way to get a schematic. (This was before I had an income, and before the internet.)
 
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