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Need help with this speed controller!!!

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
I purchased a speed controller off of Wish(I know) now, it says this thing is 220v AC input only. It's spec's apparently are Input: 220v AC Output: 50v-220v 2000w (input must be 220v) Now my problem is where in the world do I find a 220v input that runs on just 2 wires +&-. Pictures below. ThanksScreenshot_20190330-073303.png
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It looks like a simple TRIAC controller and should work fine with 120VAC.
Nothing bad will happen if you connect 120vAC to try it.
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Just bear in mind that any part of that circuit could be at mains voltage :eek:.
 

rjenkinsgb

Active Member
The + & -, if it has those markings, will presumably be the output to the motor.

The other two terminals should be AC input?
 

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
Yea it's marked input output, one second I'ma link it's "description" given by the company, better yet gonna copy and paste.....
Features:
This item has new two-way large power silicon controlled rectifier and
the current can be up to 25A, which is a good solution to over current
of electric stove wire caused by low resistance during cooling.
Convenient to use, simply connect input terminals to either 220V
wire(live wire or neutral wire) and output to load, then rotate knob to
control voltage.
With a wide voltage regulating range, the output voltage can be easily adjusted from 50V to 220V.
Could be widely used as heat controller on electric stoves, water
heaters, light dimmer on lamps, speed controller on small motors, or
temperature controller on electric soldering iron, etc.
This voltage regulator has wave voltage absorption circuit which can
effectively protect large power silicon controlled rectifier and
ensures a longer service life and durability.

Specifications:
Input Voltage: AC220V(NOT 110V)
Max Power: 2000W
Output Voltage: AC 50V to 220V
Size: 48 x 35 x 28mm / 1.89 x 1.37 x 1.1"

Package Includes:
1 x Voltage Regulator
Note: The input voltage of this voltage regulator can NOT be 110V.
 

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
They even emailed me making it seem like I was completely daft stating, it's not possible for it to be 110v AC input......I think the Chinese are trying to get me electrocuted.
 

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
Also thank you all for the helpful replies, it being my first post and me not being really well versed in electrical things( I have a friend I go to and clear just anything I'm thinking of doing to make sure I don't get killed) and I generally don't mess with anything over 12v.....but due to me not paying attention I ordered two of these things.... when I needed something else all together.... anyway, I guess the safest thing to do is to wire it up, plug it up and test it with a voltmeter? I just can't see how this thing is supposed to be 220v AC input.....
 

rjenkinsgb

Active Member
Wire it up to a 110V supply and connect it to a lamp, to see what it does.

I'd guess that, at worst, it may not be able to give full output on 110V without a resistor change - or the preset pot on the board adjusting?

Do NOT touch it while it is plugged in to power, the whole circuit board is live and could be lethal....
 

Reloadron

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Now my problem is where in the world do I find a 220v input that runs on just 2 wires +&-. Pictures below. Thanks
If I knew where in the world you were I may have a better suggestion. As to 220 / 240 VAC two wire that is really quite common. My house mains are 240 VAC split phase at the entry (120 VAC either line to neutral/ground).

Wire it up to a 110V supply and connect it to a lamp, to see what it does.

I'd guess that, at worst, it may not be able to give full output on 110V without a resistor change - or the preset pot on the board adjusting?

Do NOT touch it while it is plugged in to power, the whole circuit board is live and could be lethal....
That is also my thinking.

Ron
 

summitville

Member
I purchased a speed controller off of Wish(I know) now, it says this thing is 220v AC input only. It's spec's apparently are Input: 220v AC Output: 50v-220v 2000w (input must be 220v) Now my problem is where in the world do I find a 220v input that runs on just 2 wires +&-. Pictures below. Thanks
Where in the world are you located?
What is the Min / Max Input Voltage Range for that 220 vac Input spec ?
+/- 10 % ?
I have 240 Volts AC with 2 wires.
Most of the populated areas of the world has 220 - 240 vac on 2 wires
 

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
Lol I'm in Texas, and as stated before I'm new to all this, let me be more clear on the two wire deal, I know that 220v plugs have 3 wires , one of those being ground, the board has only two slots for input, one of which is negative. So when I say how do I find a 220v input with two wires i mean one with 1 hot and one negative. And yes my plan is to hook it up to some LED strips I have lying around that need 55 v to light up with it control at its lowest setting. And with the board screwed onto a piece of wood but ty for the reminder.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Lol I'm in Texas, and as stated before I'm new to all this, let me be more clear on the two wire deal, I know that 220v plugs have 3 wires , one of those being ground, the board has only two slots for input, one of which is negative. So when I say how do I find a 220v input with two wires i mean one with 1 hot and one negative. And yes my plan is to hook it up to some LED strips I have lying around that need 55 v to light up with it control at its lowest setting. And with the board screwed onto a piece of wood but ty for the reminder.
Please try to connect to 120VAC before you try 220 (240). The controller you have is based on a triac. The triac will work no matter if it is 220, 120 or 24VAC.

The two-wire 220 is just the two live wires (no neutral).
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
220 has been bumped up to 240 in the US. So we generally have 240/120 split phase. Called single phase because the primary is single phase. The secondary is a 240 V center-tapped transformer with the center tap going to ground and neutral.

There is 3-wire and 4-wire 240; the latter contains a neutral.

Electric drier hookups, the older ones, unfortunately, get wierd. https://fredsappliance.com/service/3-prong-vs-4-prong-dryer-outlets-whats-the-difference/
 

summitville

Member
Lol I'm in Texas, and as stated before I'm new to all this, let me be more clear on the two wire deal, I know that 220v plugs have 3 wires , one of those being ground, the board has only two slots for input, one of which is negative. So when I say how do I find a 220v input with two wires i mean one with 1 hot and one negative. And yes my plan is to hook it up to some LED strips I have lying around that need 55 v to light up with it control at its lowest setting. And with the board screwed onto a piece of wood but ty for the reminder.
OK, Texas ... Yes, they have 240VAC with two wires = "Hot-to-Hot".
It appears that you have no place to connect a Neutral or a Ground wire to your Speed Controller
Can you post a better photo of the AC input connector ?
I do not understand your Input connections, "... the board has only two slots for input, one of which is negative ..." ???
What does it say on the Four (4) Screw Terminal Strip?
[ AC Input ] ... [ - ] ... [ - ] ... [ Load ]


Are your LED Strips "dimmable" ?
On some LED Strips, it is better to vary the current, instead of the voltage
Please post URL links to the LED Strip and the Speed Controller.
 
Last edited:

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
I know that 220v plugs have 3 wires , one of those being ground, the board has only two slots for input, one of which is negative. So when I say how do I find a 220v input with two wires i mean one with 1 hot and one negative. .
You often see Chinese equipment marked Live and N for 240v equipment, this is because they also ship to Europe and that is the nature of the supply.
In N.A. you just use both 120v legs, IOW you don't need a N, it's just the way they label it.
Max.
 

DamDannyUDumb

New Member
I understand that 220 uses two live wires, what you haven't seen is the bottom of the board, where it's marked Neg on both sides, these terminals are linked together and to nothing else which leaves me to believe they are both truly Neg. No I haven't tested it yet on any voltage as my "handler" lol has been quite busy, and I promised him I wouldn't go trying to hook this thing up alone. Thanks again ever.
 

summitville

Member
I bet the voltage varies when you vary the current.
Of course it does, but what you are implying, is not what I wrote.
Read what I wrote, and then think, before you reply.

I wrote ...
" ... On some LED Strips, it is better to vary the current, instead of the voltage. ..."

On some LED Strips when you vary / control the current, you can get a nice linear dimming response.
On some LED Strips when you vary / control the voltage, the dimming may occur very abruptly.
Got it?
 

MaxHeadRoom78

Well-Known Member
I understand that 220 uses two live wires, what you haven't seen is the bottom of the board, where it's marked Neg on both sides, these terminals are linked together and to nothing else which leaves me to believe they are both truly Neg..
What do you mean by 'Truly Neg'?
The only difference between a 'Live' conductor and N is that the N is referenced to earth ground, the board should not be able to tell the difference, ONLY if the N were connected to ground source, but this would be totally illegal.

e.g. All the Chinese VFD's usually come marked either with a phase conductor for 3ph supply or a phase And a N such as R.- S/N - T for single phase.
In the case of N.A. 1ph, the connection would be R & S.
Max.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
e.g. All the Chinese VFD's usually come marked either with a phase conductor for 3ph supply or a phase And a N such as R.- S/N - T for single phase.
In the case of N.A. 1ph, the connection would be R & S.
Max.
i think the OP has his plate full already, bringing in 3-phase into the discussion will only tend to confuse things further. this discussion has been about single-phase and "split phase" house wiring, and whether he can use his TRIAC controller on a normal single phase outlet.
to OP: the only thing that might cause problems with your TRIAC device is if the breakover voltage of the trigger diode (a DIAC that triggers the TRIACs gate) is higher than 120V.
 

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