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Need help repairing 8mm film editor transformer bad, need 6V at watts to run bulb?

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BSA-LLC

New Member
Hello Forum,

I am new to this group but not to electronics. I have a 30 year old BAIA 8mm movie editor I got out of storage. I use to make stop motion animation movies when 8mm movie camera were all one had.

I would like to fix my old editor which will not work, right now. The transformer seems to be bad (tested with DMM). The editor's bulb is a 6V (DC I am guessing?) bulb rated at 30 watts. I tried digi Key and Jamco for a power transformer but no luck. My other option is to make a cluster of 3 super bright LEDs and just power those off a wall wart.

Any CONSTRUCTIVE! suggestions or ideas will be appreciated.

BSA-LLC
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you have a part number or any information on the bulb?
You could use a wall wart and drive the bulb.
I would think they are running 6VAC into the bulb. (are there diodes?)

If you are starting over you probably can get a bulb that screws into that socket with about any voltage rating. (send us a picture) Probably could get a 12 volt bulb and a 12V transformer. (assuming AC)
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
When I look for a replacement bulb I get this:

6V 10 watt.
BUT
The projector claims 30 watt.
So you need 6V at 5A to get 30 watts. I think AC or DC will both work.
 

Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
This transformer from Farnell should work. It has tw0 6 volt secondaries which can be connected in parallel. If the bulb is fed directly from the transformer then it must be running on AC. (A filament bulb can be run on either AC or DC) If you change to using a LED or group of LEDs then the optics between the light source and the film may need modifying.

Les.
 

RODALCO

Well-Known Member
Projector lamps often have filaments which cover a rectangular area to get good light on the film or exposure hence low voltage and high current. You could try a Luxeon 3 Or 5 Watt led which have a very bright output, maybe diffuse it with some milky perplex. Is your old lamp still ok ?
 

BSA-LLC

New Member
Here is the bulb information. I am not sure whether it is an AC or DC powered bulb? It does say here 20 Watts rather than what I stated?

You guys have been very helpful. I appreciate the help.

Thanks,

BSA-LLC


Part Number: RSE-43 *2pcs (yes, you will get 2 lamps for this price)
Volt (V): 6
Watts (W): 20
Filament: C-6
Description: BI-PIN
Base: G4
CT Kelvin: 3000
ANSI CODE: ESB/FHN Lumens/CP: 280
Life (H): 100 LCL: 19.5




Operating pos.:
ANY
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I am not sure whether it is an AC or DC powered bulb?
Should not matter. The power line is running at 50 or 60hz. Power is put into the bulb 100 or 120 time a second. It takes a while for the bulb to heat up/cool off. It should not make a difference AC or DC.

If you go to a LED, they stop making light very fast. You will get 120hz flashes if you apply AC. (rectified AC) I think the LED rout is too much work.
 
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