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Need help identifying a connector

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bighand

New Member
I need some help identifying a connector. It's a rectangular 8-way (2 rows of 4). It look a bit like an IDC connector, except the pin spacing in .125" rather than .100", and it has two orientation keys instead of one central key.



 

bmace36

New Member
It does look like a car part. The automotive industries likes to make there connector slightly different from consumer connectors.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
That's why I asked. Some are available and some are not and they give different places to look, It might be that one polarization is easy to obtain, bit others are not.
 

bighand

New Member
It is yes. It's the IR central locking receiver from my Peugeot. It's located in a place that makes it susceptible to water damage, and since new receivers are no longer available I was looking into making a small batch of replacements for some people in an owner's club.

This is a compatible variant of the connector from another model if it helps anyone identify it:

 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I major supplier of connectors is Delphi. So, check here: http://delphi.com/connectors

In many cases, the minimums will be extremely high.

What I would suggest doing is to purchase a pencil sandblasting system: e.g. http://www.armourproducts.com/ecom-prodshow/61-5020.html

And clean up the contacts.

Then I would electroplate Nickel, then gold. See: http://www.caswellplating.com/ There is an electro-less gold but many contain cyanide and might not be available to you.

I purchased wafer probing needles for work and suddenly they started falling apart. The manufacturer changed from brazing to soldering. They were able to change the solder type for me, but they still had an issue, At high temperatures they would corrode. They would not plate the probes because of contamination of their bath from the solder, so I had to boil the probes in baking soda and electroless plate them. Where I worked, we did a lot of evaporating of nickel and sputtering of molybdenum and used to do a fair bit of gold. I had to special order gold plated pin contacts because of the corrosion, This required a 300 pc minimum.

Use a decent dielectric grease in the connector.

You might do better removing the connector and plating it together. You might have to remove the conformal coating if it has one and re-apply.

Your owner's club might be able to help you participate in a group buy for the materials.

I don't see an easy way out, but the one I just outlined will work. I'd suggest practicing on one or any pin connector.
 
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