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Motor Problem

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PhillDubya

New Member
Been a while...:eek:

Another question for the pros here.

Control System Problem

If I told you I had a single phase motor with:
3 leads, one common, one forward, and finally, one reverse, and I was having a controls issue, and just for grins I measured the voltage between each of these leads, and ground, and got a 220VAC. Now, the motor is NOT running, it is NOT bad, and it is not drawing current, what would you say it was? How is this even possible?

I am baffled... I have this Beckwith: The Control This is where I thought the problem was, but I have a manual control that circumvents the Beckwith tap changer, that will not operate the motor either, yet, again, there is 240 between each of the motor leads and ground???

Your thoughts are appreciated as always.

Thanks
 
Last edited:

BrownOut

Banned
My guess is there is an opening somewhere in the controller feeding the "common" connection. I'd try bypassing the common on the board.
 

PhillDubya

New Member
My guess is there is an opening somewhere in the controller feeding the "common" connection. I'd try bypassing the common on the board.

Yeah, but I have 220VAC on the common. Is there any reason why you would ever intentionally put a voltage on all three of the terminals?

To lock the motor maybe? I am grasping at straws...

Thanks
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Usually the common line would be at 0 V. If there is no connection to the common line and the power is applied to one of the other connections, the common will appear at 220 V if you measure with an voltmeter.

You are just measuring the supply voltage. As there is no current flowing, there is no voltage drop across the motor.
 

PhillDubya

New Member
The 250VAC on all three terminals was a grounding issue, yet didn't solve the problem.

Thanks for all the help. Have yet to figure the whole problem out yet, will update.
 
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