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Low voltage high heat needed

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chemelec

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It would be More Practical to heat up the aggregate, Than put it in the Chamber and Vacuum It.

Just Heating the Air, to hopefully transfer some heat to the aggregate will probably not likely increase removal of water in the aggregate.
Because the Mass of the Air is Small compared to the Mass of the aggregate.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Based on my experience, which is turbo pumps, roots blowers, and rotary van pumps as well as Tenney environmental chambers (non vacuum).

Water is a pain to remove. You also seem to have a lot of "surface area" which is another big problem, So, essentially you have a lot of "virtual leaks". An RGA or Resisdual Gas analyzer can tell you when your done.

1st: I think you need a method of agitation or really a method of exposure, so that the surface of the aggregate gets exposed continuously.
2: Part #2 is remove as much moisture that you can with pump/purge cycles with a normal vacuum pump. Water gets stuck about 100 um You may have to open the ballast on the pump. Your purge would be dry nitrogen, If you do a lot of it, the use high pressure LN2 to generate the Nitrogen.
3; Quartz IR heaters work fine in vacuum. They can actually just be suspended with a C shaped piece of stainless and holes on the edge,
It isn't the most fun to wire because the wiring is "exposed". Glass tubes can protect it somewhat, If you use an SCR based controller for temperature, be sure you have a relay that cuts power completely and have a second temperature safety.
3: If you want little or no contamination, you would likely need a turbomolecular pump with a rough pump backing, but I'd look into a roots blower so you can have higher purge rates.
4: You night also require pressure control.
5: Once that stage is complete, you can pump down with a turbomolecular pump.

An RGA is your friend in this case and, I think, IR heating is your only option.

I don't think you want stirring, but rather a flat conveyer of aggrigate illuminated with IR.

Without being able to reach the boiling point of water, you have to rely on vacuum. You need exposure of the aggregate too and some heat. I see a complex process and not a fast one. Pump/purge cycles with dry nitrogen will get rid of a lot of the initial water.

ff you need something more continuous and high flow, then a roots blower and backing pump, combined with a pressure controller and mass flow controller.

Lower flows won't need the roots blower.

An RGA is the only way to know if you got the water out. There are sampling RGA's too. Most of the time an RGA is used with a turbo pump. Helium is injected at leak points and the helium is found by the RGA. The Helium needs to be localized and not sprayed all over everywhere.
 

spec

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Most Helpful Member
There are a myriad of pass through that we have access to. at this point we are using both electrical and rotary pass throughs. I am not opposed to another. the target design hieght would be 25mm or smaller. 1 kw is higher than we want as I don't want to tax the syatem from existing demands.
OK: how much electrical power can you use?

spec
 
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