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JUNEBUG on its way

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MrDEB

Well-Known Member
suggestions on adding a zif socket?
I am guessing that I can just add a second board (DIY) with socket mounted on it then a ribbon cable connected from Junebug socket to zif socket board.
Then need to study more about programming PICs.
projects = DEER CHASER(see posts), reaction timer and e.t. timer for pinewood derby drag racing.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Not much of a reason to add a ZIF socket, just use the ISP interface, then you just simply add a header to your project board and you're all set.
 

blueroomelectronics

Well-Known Member
There's not enough space around the 18F1320 for any ZIF socket I'm aware of. If you find one I'd be happy to post the part on my site.

The Firefly Z is a Junebug compatible ZIF socket kit(all the kits we sell work great with either the Inchworm or Junebug) Schematic is in the Firefly manual of course.

I also suggest you download and install Swordfish BASIC as it's IMO the easiest to get going and pretty awesome to boot.
 
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Sceadwian

Banned
I think he was planning on making something that plugged into the existing socket with a ribbon cable so he could put a ZIF socket on a remote board. Seems a bit over kill for a handful of units though.
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
Planning on using JUNEBUG

to program a pic then unplug from Junebug and insert into a project.
I am hoping the DEER CHASER project works as well as I hope then maybe sell lots of units.
The zif socket ifs to hold a pic while programming (the ribbon cable from the Junebug to zif.
 

blueroomelectronics

Well-Known Member
The Junebug and all ICP PIC programmers use a 5 wire interface to the target PIC.
It's really handy as you can program / debug your project while it's in circuit. It costs 2.5 I/O pins (MCLR, PGC & PGD) but just use a larger part till you get the hang of programming PICs.
A 18F2525 or 18F4620 are both very capable 28 & 40 pin PICs so you're not likely to notice the loss of 2.5 I/O pins.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
If I'm not mistaken depending on how they're loaded the ISP lines can still be used for general I/O but if you ever get that tight on I/O space you should use a bigger chip.
 
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