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Ideal suppliers and Shorting

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Electronman

New Member
an ideal voltage source has an internal resistance of zero. this means that it can deliver any current while its voltage is not affected, right? If so then what will happen if I put a zero resistor to its terminals or short its terminals?
If I put a voltmeter across a such supplier then what what do I''ll read when I short the supplier?

THANKS
 

Warpspeed

Member
You will still read the correct output voltage.

The current will be infinite.
Not just thousands of millions of amps but truly INFINITE.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
An ideal voltage source is just that, mathematically ideal, none such can exist in the real world.
 
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Karkas

Member
The circuit theory says that you can't short circuit an ideal voltage current, because as you said its internal resistance is "0". And you can not either left in open circuit an ideal current source because its internal resistance is infinite.
 

Electronman

New Member
The circuit theory says that you can't short circuit an ideal voltage current, because as you said its internal resistance is "0". And you can not either left in open circuit an ideal current source because its internal resistance is infinite.

Thanks for all inputs.

Can somebody explain it mathmatecaly to me? When you short a voltage source then how does it feeds another load which is parallel to that shorted pin??!
 

Karkas

Member
Thanks for all inputs.

Can somebody explain it mathmatecaly to me?
If you make the calculus you will have an infinite current, and that mathematically is right, but the circuit theory says that you can't short circuit that source.

When you short a voltage source then how does it feeds another load which is parallel to that shorted pin??!
It couldn't, because no current will flow through a load that is bigger than "0" when there's a short circuit.

is there any disagreement or confusion?
 
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Warpspeed

Member
It can feed as many additional loads that you have, at full voltage too.

Simply because the current source is infinite, so it can never be overloaded.
 

Noggin

Member
Thanks for all inputs.

Can somebody explain it mathmatecaly to me? When you short a voltage source then how does it feeds another load which is parallel to that shorted pin??!

If you short a non-ideal voltage source then it will NOT power a load parallel to the short.
 
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