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how many of you are ham operators?

cyb0rg777

New Member
I think I'm going to start studying for the test. Does anyone know where to find FREE study guides. I found ham radio for dummies,so i'm not a dummy now I graduated to clueless. Not much info there, it's pretty much an introduction or overview but no help on the test. I found practice tests but I don't really want to start with a test. I need reading info or videos. I have an aarl handbook from 1995 but it's old and big as a phone book.

Any suggestions for study material?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I ran across practice tests on the net a ways back, google it. I'm too lazy to remember where I found it, and I haven't fleshed out the circuit I want to build that would require me getting a license yet. All you really need is basic electronics knowledge, with some knowledge of impedance, and to study FCC rules for HAM operators, such as band spacing, frequency allotment, that kind of stuff.
 

mechie

New Member
Hams Hall ?

This must be one of those subjects where the answer will vary from country to country (or U.S. state to state?).

In the U.K. we now have three levels, foundation, intermediate and advanced (also called 'full').
Our foundation license requires only a basic awareness of Ohm's law and simple wiring (you are NOT expected to fit a mains plug on a cable, that's seen as too advanced !), a reasonable understanding of the regulations is required - but that's not too daunting, and a bit of radio protocol is required - again, nothing too dificult.

Morse code is still compulsory but you are given the code on paper and as long as you need to copy and send a short message.

As a foundation license holder you are allowed only 10W transmit power, only commercial equipment (no modded or homebrew gear) and a vast amount of the amateur frequency spectrum. This still allows UK to Russia, sometimes even UK to America communications ! A full license holder is normally limited to 400W in the U.K. - I think the U.S. are allowed 1kW ???

Find a local Ham club, they should be able to help you through the test, maybe even run courses for beginners - the test costs something like £20 ?

M3NZQ
 
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mechie

New Member
Morse the PTT ?

Nigel Goodwin said:
... ... ... back in my day it was class A (morse) or class B (no morse).
Nope ! Morse is now just "appreciation" - an introduction in the hope that individuals will take up CW if/when their equipment allows.

I have seen a couple of U.K. websites (some run by radio clubs - who should know better) still referring to 'A' and 'B' licenses as if this were current but this aint so ! - there are three levels, main difference is power output !
 

Andy1845c

Active Member
Well, I just passed my general test tonight :D Should have a call sign to add to the list in a few days.
 

Leftyretro

New Member
WA6TKD here, but not very active but that might change with my coming retirement.

Lefty
 

Marks256

New Member
Well, I just passed my general test tonight Should have a call sign to add to the list in a few days.
Congratulations, Andy1845c! ;)
 

Andy1845c

Active Member
Thanks. Now you oughta get yours.;) One of the VEs that gave my test said he expects the test to get harder in the future to make up for the code being dropped. Not sure if thats true, but now seems to be the time to do it if you have been thinking about it. There were somthing like 15 people testing in Mankato lastnight. They said there were lucky to have 4 before the code was dropped.
 

TekNoir

New Member
I've read that they will be changing the question pool for General class on June 30th of this year and for the Extra class on June 30th of next year. They do so semi-regularly due to changing requirements with the FCC. If not mistaken, I believe that the Technician class pool was changed last year.

With the drop in code requirements, I would not be surprised if they made the exams a little bit more difficult, though the drop in the code requirements were said to be made in order to encourage more people to take the exams.
 

Marks256

New Member
Thanks. Now you oughta get yours. One of the VEs that gave my test said he expects the test to get harder in the future to make up for the code being dropped. Not sure if thats true, but now seems to be the time to do it if you have been thinking about it. There were somthing like 15 people testing in Mankato lastnight. They said there were lucky to have 4 before the code was dropped.
How much did it cost?
 

Andy1845c

Active Member
Marks256 said:
How much did it cost?
$14.00. As far as I could tell, its 14 bucks to take as many tests as you want in one night, but you don't get the money back if you fail.
 

Marks256

New Member
that isn't very expensive. I would like to get some form of an amateur radio licence before i graduate high school.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
To what ends Marks?
 

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