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How Do You Mount Your Power Strips?

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #1
Hello there,

How do you mount yours?

I am asking because i was going for something more sturdy than just using two screws and then hanging the power strip on those two. It seems too loose for me.
I'd like to be able to gently but with some force rock it back and forth and have it feel nice and solid.
It's hard to do though because there are two holes in the back that are made for silly hanging.
Maybe some straps, a plate, something...
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
#2
As you've found, it's quite tricky to get the screws in exactly the right distance to make the power strip nice and firm. If it's on a wooden wall, or there's a convenient wooden batten behind the strip you can place a single screw above the middle of it, pointing down at about 45 degrees, screw it down until the head of the screw nicely locks it in place. If you've got brick walls, then fasten a wooden batten directly across the top of it, fasten the batten with two screws and wall plugs - or perhaps even one?.
 

granddad

Active Member
#3
If it has key holes at the back then use a nut and bolt to fix it to a thin timber batten, then screw the batten to the wall. if it has no holes ? lots of hot glue may work ...
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#4
It is a lot easier to mount these with "wood screws" screws that have a bevel between head and shaft vs a flat head. . The angled taper between shaft and head give you a bit bigger range of "perfect" distance. The flat, 90° will ether be too tight and won't allow the strip to lock into place or it will be too loose (unless you get lucky.

5D1A0909-F847-43B6-B618-17A199A3F027.jpeg
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#6
It's called a 'counter sunk' screw, and is by far the most common wood screw.
The name "counter sunk screw" has not caught on in the US. They are generally known as wood screws on this side of the pond. Fortunately, many items with screws included in the package, often come with the cheapest fastener the manufacturer can find which may be sheet metal screws - like the image on the left in my post above.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #9
As you've found, it's quite tricky to get the screws in exactly the right distance to make the power strip nice and firm. If it's on a wooden wall, or there's a convenient wooden batten behind the strip you can place a single screw above the middle of it, pointing down at about 45 degrees, screw it down until the head of the screw nicely locks it in place. If you've got brick walls, then fasten a wooden batten directly across the top of it, fasten the batten with two screws and wall plugs - or perhaps even one?.
Hi,

That sounds like a very good idea, i'll have to see if i can implement that here too.
I am mounting on a sheet rock wall.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #10
If it has key holes at the back then use a nut and bolt to fix it to a thin timber batten, then screw the batten to the wall. if it has no holes ? lots of hot glue may work ...
Hi,

I wanted to do that, but when the bolts go through the backing they stick out the back of that so the backing strip is no longer flat on the back but would have bolts sticking out the back. Maybe grind them flush?
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #11
It is a lot easier to mount these with "wood screws" screws that have a bevel between head and shaft vs a flat head. . The angled taper between shaft and head give you a bit bigger range of "perfect" distance. The flat, 90° will ether be too tight and won't allow the strip to lock into place or it will be too loose (unless you get lucky.

View attachment 115685
Hi,

Yeah that could help too. I was planning on using "Molly" bolts but not sure if that is going to work that well. I am leaning toward a 'backer strip with the top screw as per Nigel's reply. I'll have to figure out what to use for the backing too i guess.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #12
"Pedal tape" for fixing guitar pedals would probably work well.

It's a bit like velcro on steroids, rigid plastic "mushroom" shapes that interlock when pressed together.
Example:
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Guitar-E...rip-Pedalboard-Roll-Dual-Lock-3M/162903697002

Or just use a couple of large cable ties, either end between the outer sockets. That works well for attaching to such as metal bars in some type of desk.
Hi,

Dont think i've ever seen that sort of tape.
 
#13

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #14
It is extremely strong, but things can be dismounted when required.

When two pieces are fully pressed together, they are pretty much rigid, no "wobble" as with velcro - and the adhesive itself is much thicker and stronger than any other type I've seen.

You can get it from ebay, music shops, Amazon etc.
https://www.amazon.com/GODLYKE-PG-1M-Power-Grip-Pedalboard-Mounting/dp/B004ZKIHVU
Hi again,

Thanks for the link.

How strong is the adhesive as that looks like it is important for the first installation.
 
#15
The adhesive is stronger than the attachment between the two pieces if material (the "velcro" style effect).
In turn, that is also stronger than the bonded attachment between the rubber base on a guitar pedal and the metal or plastic plate that is fixed to.

It's formed in quite a thick layer that conforms to surfaces and it's supposed to be allowed to cure for 24 hours from removing the backing tape to using it under load.
It's nothing like the typical stuff on eg. double-sided tapes.

I've never managed to accidentally pull the adhesive off anything - or tried to deliberately - so all I can say is it's very!!! strong.
(I have always cleaned the surfaces with alcohol, IPA, before applying the tapes).
 
#16
My option is to buy power strips/power bars with external flanges and screw those in without trying to match "slots" in the cheaper power bars.. Typical power strips with external flanges are Tripplite/Isobar and some Hammond. I'm sure there are more vendors with external mounting holes..
Ones like the Isobar power bars include RFI suppressors and other EMI filters, and are in metal cases. Better for electronics work....
 
#17
If you want those mounted solid without wobble, Mount them to a board. Use a countersink bolt and nut.

Counter bore a hole on back side for nut ( use socket ). Hold the bolt with a little friction as you can't use the head from the strip being there.

Loctite, then mount the board as needed. More work but you can get them holing pretty good.

Works good on a 2x4 on a work bench. Just get the thru holes drilled in the right location. A longer bolt will give you something to grab on to as well.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #18
The adhesive is stronger than the attachment between the two pieces if material (the "velcro" style effect).
In turn, that is also stronger than the bonded attachment between the rubber base on a guitar pedal and the metal or plastic plate that is fixed to.

It's formed in quite a thick layer that conforms to surfaces and it's supposed to be allowed to cure for 24 hours from removing the backing tape to using it under load.
It's nothing like the typical stuff on eg. double-sided tapes.

I've never managed to accidentally pull the adhesive off anything - or tried to deliberately - so all I can say is it's very!!! strong.
(I have always cleaned the surfaces with alcohol, IPA, before applying the tapes).
Hi,

Oh yes that makes more sense now. If it is thick and strong, that's what i need.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #19
My option is to buy power strips/power bars with external flanges and screw those in without trying to match "slots" in the cheaper power bars.. Typical power strips with external flanges are Tripplite/Isobar and some Hammond. I'm sure there are more vendors with external mounting holes..
Ones like the Isobar power bars include RFI suppressors and other EMI filters, and are in metal cases. Better for electronics work....
Hi,

I have one larger one like that, but my 'regular' ones dont have that flange. Thus i'd like to do them too and hopefully get as much strength as the one with the flanges. The one with the flanges was like 35 dollars (USD) the ones without are like 5 dollars each.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thread starter #20
If you want those mounted solid without wobble, Mount them to a board. Use a countersink bolt and nut.

Counter bore a hole on back side for nut ( use socket ). Hold the bolt with a little friction as you can't use the head from the strip being there.

Loctite, then mount the board as needed. More work but you can get them holing pretty good.

Works good on a 2x4 on a work bench. Just get the thru holes drilled in the right location. A longer bolt will give you something to grab on to as well.
Hi,

Yeah i guess a thicker board would do it. I'd have to see if the distance it would bring the strip out from the wall would bother anything in front of it. I could probably live with 1/4 inch but 3/4 inch would be pushing it.
 

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