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Hacksaw choices

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
JimB's Hacksaw .. .. .. . ??
Close but not quite.
That looks like the one which was linked to earlier, which is probably the successor* to the one which I have.

* Successor = the newer updated cheaper version which does not perform as well as the original but it is a few cents cheaper to produce (in China).
As a result the bean counters are as happy as pigs in straw.
Rant_Mode = OFF.

JimB
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Close but not quite.
That looks like the one which was linked to earlier, which is probably the successor* to the one which I have.

* Successor = the newer updated cheaper version which does not perform as well as the original but it is a few cents cheaper to produce (in China).
As a result the bean counters are as happy as pigs in straw.
Rant_Mode = OFF.
In the TV trade we called it 'cost improved' :D

A classic example was a particular 28 inch Sony CRT set, which had quite nice sound as it had a sub-woofer fitted in the back. The same set next year was identical, except the model number changed by ONE, and they left the sub-woofer out. If I remember correctly it was kv28ls35 and kv28ls36?.

I actually BOUGHT a TV a couple of years ago, I'd never ever bought one before - and I bought a specific Sony 43 inch Android set, as it was highly featured and had probably the best picture of any of the sets around. There was no way the new models were going to improve on it, so I put my hand in my pocket and spent some money :D
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
My use-case for the rotated blade is occasional cutting down a long length of sheet material like steel (so as not to distort the edge with snips) or plastic (also applies to larger pieces of copperclad)
That's what a Monodex is for!

They take a narrow strip out of the material and leave pretty straight edges in the main sheet. You do need a new blade occasionally, especially with fibreglass board as that's quite abrasive.

They can also cut curves, which may be good or bad, depending how much of a knack you have at driving them!
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
I've wondered about getting nibblers before. Decided against it at the time, probably due to cost compared to how much I would actually use them.
DrG - He's not called Max, is he?
 

DrG

Active Member
I've wondered about getting nibblers before. Decided against it at the time, probably due to cost compared to how much I would actually use them.
DrG - He's not called Max, is he?
Sorry about that, I got carried away :) That was a pick of wrestler Hacksaw Jim Duggin.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most left handed people are to some extent ambidextrous so it's rare this kind of thing causes an actual problem. It's just annoying.
Trying to teach them things made me more ambidextrous too.

My use-case for the rotated blade is occasional cutting down a long length of sheet material like steel (so as not to distort the edge with snips) or plastic (also applies to larger pieces of copperclad). After finally being able to visualise the thing (after looking at the pipe-cutting-man photo) I realised that what would happen in my case is that it's actually the right-handed person who has to flip the blade, and gets the back of the saw dropping below the blade level. For me it would be the same way round as pipe-cutting-man, but the back of the blade would be above the blade level. Just puts my hand at a reversed angle (fingers upwards).
You are talking flipping the blade end for end, I was talking a flip side to side.:)

As a man of many things metal, I don't understand the part of having distortion when using snips on sheet metal. To do it with no distortion you need to do it in two steps, The first cut is made proud of the intended line by 1/8" to !/4" then the second cut is made on the line. And never cut to the end of the blade length, always keep the cut within the total length of the blade. It's the little "snip" at the end of the blade that causes distortion when using tin snips.
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
No, I was talking of the sideways flip.
I never thought of making 2 cuts. I'll try that next time. Usually it doesn't matter, but just occasionally I want a piece to be dead flat without me having to actually flatten it (because manufactured flatness is always better than what I can achieve)
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
Well, if you are right handed and you want to do a sideways cut, you want the teeth pointing left. If you are left handed, you want them pointing the other way, which is right!
 

throbscottle

Well-Known Member
I know I know. I was suspicious when I saw it first from RS because they were chucking in a tape measure.
Go on, laugh yer parts off....
 

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