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Hacker-space, maker-space etc.

Mickster

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Back in the day, rather than spending ages trying to repair a vehicle door if it was a bit more damage than a simple dent, but not enough to warrant replacing the whole door, you would simply replace the "skin".
The outer skin is folded over the metalwork which comprises the actual door body, all along the edges. You would make hacksaw cuts at the points to both sides of the bottom of the window glass, then grind through the folded edges, to remove the skin. We prefer pics here, rather than lengthy descriptions, so here goes:
index.144.gif index.145.gif

So, a friend of mine was replacing a door skin and needed some better light than just the overhead ones in the shop. Cue a 12V inspection light, a discharged 12V battery, and a battery charger. And a grinder...

There was a bang. Bits of plastic and acid everywhere, luckily we both had safety glasses on, but the funny part was my friend stood there, looking at the back end of the grinder he had just been using, which was now completely minus the power cord and half of the plastic casing. We washed everything down with a hose, to dilute the acid, but by the time we got home, our clothes were pretty much falling off.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Back in the day, rather than spending ages trying to repair a vehicle door if it was a bit more damage than a simple dent, but not enough to warrant replacing the whole door, you would simply replace the "skin".
The outer skin is folded over the metalwork which comprises the actual door body, all along the edges. You would make hacksaw cuts at the points to both sides of the bottom of the window glass, then grind through the folded edges, to remove the skin. We prefer pics here, rather than lengthy descriptions, so here goes:
View attachment 113768 View attachment 113769

So, a friend of mine was replacing a door skin and needed some better light than just the overhead ones in the shop. Cue a 12V inspection light, a discharged 12V battery, and a battery charger. And a grinder...

There was a bang. Bits of plastic and acid everywhere, luckily we both had safety glasses on, but the funny part was my friend stood there, looking at the back end of the grinder he had just been using, which was now completely minus the power cord and half of the plastic casing. We washed everything down with a hose, to dilute the acid, but by the time we got home, our clothes were pretty much falling off.
Safety glasses are a wonderful technological advance over the previous technology that so many people insist on using - Safety Squints
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
our 7th grade shop class learned by the example of one of the students who wasn't paying attention while using the sheet metal shear table, and lost about 1/4 inch of one of his fingertips. always keep a healthy respect for machine tools, the digits you save may be your own. rotating and reciprocating machines can ruin your day if you allow yourself to be distracted.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
A doctor friend of mine told me the rule of 10 for workplace accidents. You have an accident in the first 10 days due to inexperience or after 10 years due to complacency.

Mike.
 

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