Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Fundamental and harmonic power

Status
Not open for further replies.

alphacat

New Member
I use a power measurement IC which can perform the following measurements (among others):
- Fundamental Active Power.
- Harmonic Active Power.

What does each represent?

Thanks fellas.
 

BrownOut

Banned
Fundamental power often referes to the desired signal produced by the device or system. For example, if you measure the mains of a US domestic power outlet, it would refer to a 60 Hz sine wave. Harmonic power is the distortion from the ideal sine wave. It comes as a result of a fourier distrubution of harmonic frequencies that make up the distortion.

However, if the system is designed to produce a wave other than a sine wave, then the harmonics may not be distortion, rather they are intentionally produced harmonics.
 
Last edited:

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
To amplify on BrownOut's post, harmonics are frequencies that are multiples of the fundamental sine wave. Thus the second harmonic of a 60Hz sine wave is 120Hz, the third harmonic is 180Hz, etc.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top