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Faulty N002 chip - cannot locate chip and the supplier from the emblem and need to replace with a replacement

paul_b_78

New Member
Hi can anyone help me.

I have an electrical item which has gone faulty on me and have tracked it down to a faulty IC. On the IC is N002 and have identified this to be a QFP type IC.

I am unable to source a replacement and was wondering if anybody has come across this chip before and as to what other information is need.

Extra info on chip:

2819B012-ZZ (but could possibly be 28198012-ZZ)
1846# WIN_20201005_19_26_33_Pro.jpg
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Why do you think that chip is faulty?, and what does the chip do? - in 45+ years of electronics servicing I've found it's fairly rare that replacing largish chips like that cures the problem.

Also, if it's a micro (or any kind of programmable chip) you would need to source a ready programmed version from the device manufacturer.

From the number, it's quite possibly the device manufacturers own in-house number? - so completely meaningless.
 

paul_b_78

New Member
Hi Nigel,
I have done a thorough troubleshoot of the board and unless I have an incorrect schematic of the the 64 pin qcp then it is my last hope.
Do you have any pin out drawings for this type of IC
Just incase I am following an incorrect path
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi Nigel,
I have done a thorough troubleshoot of the board and unless I have an incorrect schematic of the the 64 pin qcp then it is my last hope.
Do you have any pin out drawings for this type of IC
Just incase I am following an incorrect path
No, you've still given no clue as to what the IC, and indeed the device, actually is.
 

paul_b_78

New Member
Hi Nigel Its a Nacon PS4 Wifi controller. It has a micro B usb port for charging of the 3.7v li bat and can also be powered just by the battery once charged.
I am guessing from all the messing about trying to repair this device; it would have been easier for me to replace it... but recently I fixed the wifi dongle and my nephew dropped the controller which has now failed to operate.

I hope that helps and sorry for misreading your last reply
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi Nigel Its a Nacon PS4 Wifi controller. It has a micro B usb port for charging of the 3.7v li bat and can also be powered just by the battery once charged.
I am guessing from all the messing about trying to repair this device; it would have been easier for me to replace it... but recently I fixed the wifi dongle and my nephew dropped the controller which has now failed to operate.

I hope that helps and sorry for misreading your last reply
I would have thought it's extremely unlikely that you would be able to source a replacement IC, even assuming that is what's at fault?.
 

paul_b_78

New Member
Okay thank you for your honest input..
It was worth a try...
I may do another run through though just incase I am missing something...

But can you answer this question which I am unsure on please:

If it isn't the N002 chip - do all these 64 pin chips have the same pin outs or do they differ to program set? so that I can follow the paths to relevant sources i.e. GND/ Data / Clock etc.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Okay thank you for your honest input..
It was worth a try...
I may do another run through though just incase I am missing something...

But can you answer this question which I am unsure on please:

If it isn't the N002 chip - do all these 64 pin chips have the same pin outs or do they differ to program set? so that I can follow the paths to relevant sources i.e. GND/ Data / Clock etc.
As every chip is different, and has wildly different applications, them most are going to be completely different.

The exception would be similar chips from the same manufacturer, where different microcontrollers from the same manufacturer 'usually' have similar pin connections, but there are often exceptions to this.
 

paul_b_78

New Member
Thanks again Nigel.
I will do one last thorough troubleshoot and if I cannot solve this one; will just cut my loses and buy a new controller
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If it was dropped then it's more likely a mechanical problem. Check all connections, mechanical shock rarely damages chips.

Mike.
 

cpprioli

New Member
As Pommie said, I'd look for a cracked solder joint somewhere, especially any solder joint that is large or thick. You can come across micro-cracks that you cannot see with the naked eye, and may even be hard to find under a strong lens. Do some solder iron testing by heating any larger joints. Avoid the really fine joints unless you have an adequate tip on your iron for the joint size. Look it over carefully under a high-power lens and a bright light. If dropping it caused the failure, I'd bet on a mechanical break somewhere...
 

paul_b_78

New Member
Thank you all for your advice. I did various tests and checked all solder joints with no joy.
Decided to call it a day after spending sometime trying to fix it.
In the end I just purchased a new one

Thanks again and look forward to some other advice with future repairs
 

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