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ELF generator

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koton666

New Member
Hi I'm thinking of building an device that generates extremely low frequency (ELF) waves. Can anyone assist me in this matter, as I don't know where to begin. Thanx :)
 

john1

Active Member
Hi koton666,

Are you still trying to make this ?
I made a small circuit with about ten discrete components
that gave me a fifteen second sine wave.

What sort of wave do you want?
Square waves are easy enough.

John :)
 

john1

Active Member
Hi Koton,

When i started to make this very low frequency oscillator, i
reckoned that an L.C. arrangement would need an un-reasonably
large inductor and capacitor, and to get active feedback at
frequencies that are barely more than a slowly changing D.C.
level would make normal inductive coupling quite impractical.

So i opted for a phase shift oscillator, i know them to be
fairly simple, but until then i had never built one. I looked
at all the designs i could find on the internet, and they all
were arranged like this:
 

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john1

Active Member
After i had tried making the resistors very high values, many
megs actually, and making the capacitors as high as i had, that
could be used in that circuit, i soon decided that to get higher
values of capacitance i would have to use condensers, or
electrolytic capacitors as they are now known.

The problem here is that electrolytics are uni-directional,
unlike the ones in all the circuits i could find, which are A.C.
working.

So i tried staggering them, with one up, and one down, so as to
keep the uni directional voltage, and also pass the signal,
like this:
 

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john1

Active Member
I didnt get that to work, so i tried putting the caps to ground,
and the resistors going from one to the next, like this:
 

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john1

Active Member
When that didn't work either, i was most perplexed. It took me until
the next day to realise why it wouldn't work. Quite simply, the
attenuation is so severe that it needs more gain. I stuck another
transistor in as a darlington pair and bingo, works a treat.
Like this:
 

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john1

Active Member
Unfortunately i cant find the notes i made at the time of
construction, except a few scrawly bits without any values
written in.
But i think the caps were 100 mfd, just ordinary ones,
and i think the resistors were about 30 k-ohms.
you will have to mess around with the values to get the sort
of frequency you're looking for.

Best of luck with it, John :)
 

john1

Active Member
Hi,

I would be very interested to hear what use such a
low frequency oscillator might have ?

John :)
 

Blinky

New Member
ELF band Elecrtomagnetic Sine wave generator...

I've been interested in this as well...
I"ve designed a square-wave EM wave generator controlled by software (communicates with hardware via parallel port)...
It's intended use is with brainwave entrainment... if the frequency is high enough, the sudden polarity changes may have the same effect on the human brain (essentially) as sine waves, however at lower frequencies (beta/alpha/theta/delta) aren't efficient with square waves...


The device must be accurate to .01 CPS, and preferrably have a wide range... say up to 1KHz...
Any advice?
 

pandorasbox

New Member
Just FYI, individual neurons spike and revert to base potentials in about 2 milliseconds, that corresponds to ULF (ultra low frequency), not ELF. This page talks about that issue some.

**broken link removed**
 
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