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Driving this valve-Oh lordy what have I done???

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kimbear

Member
  • Ok, when I ordered this from China, I didn't notice that it said that it was a Pulse Operated unit....what the hell does that mean???
  • It doesn't actuate on 3vdc...so how to I actuate it??
  • Analogue drivers only please.
  • Thanks in advance-I truly appreciate any help.
  • (PS, have I damaged it by hooking it up to 6Vdc I had forgotten that it was actually 3vdc...NOT 6Vdc.????!!!!!)
  • -Kim
  • SPECS:
  • Wide application and usage, can meet the different needs of customers.
  • 2 wired connector replacement solenoid valve. Male thread connector.
  • Replace the bad work solenoid valve for machine.
  • Use for: Universal
  • Powered by: 3.6V DC
  • Working Form: Positive pulse valve, Negative pulse valve
  • Electric resistance: 9Ω
  • pulse width 30ms
  • Working current: 500mA
  • Working pressure 0.05 - 1.0Mpa
  • Thread Diameter: 2cm
  • Size: Approx. 53 x 50 x 24mm/ 2.9 x 1.97 x 0.94inch
  • Material: Brass + Plastic
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Perhaps "3.6V" in the spec should read "3-6V"? With a resistance of 9Ω, the valve won't draw the quoted 500mA from a 3.6V supply.
Looks as though it needs a 30mS positive pulse to open it and a 30mS negative pulse to close it.
6V applied for a long period would overheat the valve coil.
 

Ian Rogers

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kimbear

Member

Ok, Ok...I am actually mistaken...at 3Vdc....I can actually hear a VERY faint click open, and a very faint click closed, when polarities are reversed.
Now how the Hell can is use this as a normal NC valve that opens when power is applied and closes power is off?
...or should I just bin em,...and find a regular solenoid valve:grumpy:
 
Last edited:

rumpfy

Active Member
It sounds to me like it is a bistable valve. These things use a magnetic latching method. Pulse it to turn it on then remove the power, then pulse it again with reverse polarity to turn it off. These are used to conserve battery power.
hope this helps,
rumpfy
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ok, Ok...I am actually mistaken...at 3Vdc....I can actually hear a VERY faint click open, and a very faint click closed, when polarities are reversed.
Now how the Hell can is use this as a normal NC valve that opens when power is applied and closes power is off?
...or should I just bin em,...and find a regular solenoid valve:grumpy:
You would need some electronics to do what you want- nothing too complicated, but it would be simpler to just get a regular valve.

spec
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
It sounds to me like it is a bistable valve. These things use a magnetic latching method. Pulse it to turn it on then remove the power, then pulse it again with reverse polarity to turn it off. These are used to conserve battery power.
hope this helps,
rumpfy
Indeed, for self flushing toilets, for instance.
 

MrAl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hi,

The beauty of that valve is that it STAYS in a given state even if the power goes out, just like a latching relay. That's for when the application demands such a thing of course.

You'll probably need an H bridge to drive it, but if you are willing to try, maybe a capacitor in series with the valve. When you apply +V you click it one way, when you apply -V you click it the other way, but you still need plus and minus V not just on V and off V. With the right value cap this could work but still takes a little extra circuitry most likely.

If you are not loosing too much money go with the right part for the job instead.
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Now how the Hell can is use this as a normal NC valve that opens when power is applied and closes power is off?
As Mr Al said, this valve has a feature that can be great in low power situations, in that it does not require constant electrical power to be held open. The tradeoff is a slightly more complex drive circuit. An all electronic driver is called ah H bridge. Or, it can be done with one impulse relay and a large capacitor.

ak
 

dr pepper

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I've seen them before, only a bit bigger, some call them memory valves.
Buy the right one for the job methinks, one bad thing about this is that if your circuit messes up you could end up with the valve stuck open, not good for any medium, esp somethign expensive or toxic.
 
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