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Don't you just hate it when...

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JimB

Super Moderator
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...this sort of thing happens!

Happily working away at something, holding a part in the pliers and the all of a sudden everything is on the floor.

WHAT HAPPENED???

See the attachment :mad:

JimB
 

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JimB

Super Moderator
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Actually, they are not Chinese, I think they were made in the UK and are about 20years old at a quick guess.

Looking at the fracture line, it looks like a crack started a long time ago, could even have been there from day one.

Obviously today was the day to finally let go!

On edit:
I am sure they were not quite expensive enough for Lindstrom, looking carefull there appears to be the name Wilkinson engraved on one side of the joint.

I do have some Lindstrom cutters, cost me about £30+ a couple of years ago.
An "impulse purchase" at the RS trade counter!

JimB
 
Last edited:

Nigel Goodwin

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I do have some Lindstrom cutters, cost me about £30+ a couple of years ago.
An "impulse purchase" at the RS trade counter!
My Lindstrom 625D cutters are about 35 years old, and my Lindstrom longnose 826 pliers are 39/40 years old.

The cutters have been well used at work, and will still cut a human hair right at the end :D

Damn good tools!.
 

Hero999

Banned
It looks like they've been abused to me.

Are you sure you've not lended them to someone who's done something they shouldn't have done with them?
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
It looks like they've been abused to me.
How do you come to that conclusion?

Are you sure you've not lended them to someone who's done something they shouldn't have done with them?
I think that I can safely say that I am the only one who has ever used them.

JimB
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
Weird! The exact same thing happened to me a week or so back - maybe even the same day - my favorite pair of needlenose pliers suddenly snapped like that. WTF? Sunspots? Cosmic rays?
 

Hero999

Banned
How do you come to that conclusion?
It could be a manufacturing fault (unlikely if they're good quality) but pliers don't normally fail like that unless they've been stressed in some way.
 

kpatz

New Member
I've never had pliers break like that. Mine just disappear entirely. I think there's another dimension in the universe where all our missing pens, pliers, and socks wind up.
 

Boncuk

New Member
You were lucky the part didn't take off and hit your eye. I had the same thing when squeezing a car cable connector, and my sun glasses saved my eye.

Pliers and sunglasses went the way to the garbage can - the pliers because they had become useless and so the sunglasses.
 

HATHA

New Member
My Lindstrom 625D cutters are about 35 years old, and my Lindstrom longnose 826 pliers are 39/40 years old.

The cutters have been well used at work, and will still cut a human hair right at the end :D

Damn good tools!.
impressive:eek: are those made in Carbon steel or some thing like that
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I had some name-brand pliers about 40 years then they broke suddenly like that.
Metal fatigue.
 

audioguru

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A copper wire breaks with metal fatigue if you bend it back and forth many time.
Steel is stonger but still breaks with metal fatigue if it is bent back and forth many times.

Pliers bend a little when squeezed then unbend when released. Back and forth until failure occurs.
 

dknguyen

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Oh wait, I'm thinking that steel has a fatigue minimum, not that it does not suffer from fatigue.
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Good steel has a sort of fatigue lower limit. Up to a specific point it acts like spring. Past that point is just starting to bend and hold that bent position. Sort of the point of no return in a way. If that point is passed enough times it will eventually break. How far and how often that point is passed is what will determine the limit of fatigue before it breaks.
All materials have similar properties but their point of no return can vary greatly and even the shape of the materials can affect that point.
In high shock load applications its well known that by having no sharp edges on a part can greatly increase its durability and resiliency towards stress fatigue and cracking.

The durability of one tool VS another from the same batch on an assembly line may just be the difference in which part was in the deburring process a little longer than the other. The one with sharp edges on its corners will break before the one with rounded edges on its corners will even they both may have identical working characteristics and conditions.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
TCM is spot on with this.

Look at the close-up photos.
The busted pliers have been machined with sharp corners in the joint and the surface in the joint is not much to shout about, very coarse finish from a fine pointed tool.

Sharp corners are bad in stressed components, the highest stress is at the corner and cracks will start right there.
Exactly what has happened in this case.

Compare the Lindstrom cutters, rounded corners and fine finish on the surface.
There are no high stress points to initiate cracking.

JimB
 

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