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Decapped Chip On Board

Athosworld

Member
I managed to successfully decap a number of chips from different toys and a tv remote. I taped the die of the POP Station (knockoff) to an exposition card and named it.
Im able to view a little bit of the die at naked eye and it appears to have a set of logic gates (possibly for the LCD) and a small ROM at the top (possibly for the CMOS progress saving function). What is the exact function of this chip, how does it generate an AC signal to control the LCD?
The best photo I could get: (I don’t have a microscope anymore)
6FD2151C-32A6-4EAB-9A89-97DC6D63527D.jpeg
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
to generate AC, just as with anything, you simply 'wiggle pins up and down'.
And to generate the wanted display on an LCD, the pin(s) have to be "wiggled" in exactly the right sequence and timing - a bit like sending a page of text using morse code only needs one signal "wiggling" on & off, but if the timing and sequences are not right, you get a load of nonsense.

What is the exact function of this chip, how does it generate an AC signal to control the LCD?

You really need to at least get some cheap off-the-shelf modules and parts and start building and programming simple projects & gadgets, to get an understanding of parts that have similar functions to what you keep talking about, and the programming involved!

Some examples:

 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Or one of these:

And experiment with some of the designs that can be programmed in to it, from CPUs to VGA displays to just about anything..

Note that the device in that project appears to have half the number of "slices" than LUTs, so probably 2160 slices, if I've got that right from a very quick skim through the data.

A typical 8 bit CPU looks to need about half the device, leaving the other half for display & other i/o.
 

Dick Cappels

Active Member
No practical way to tell unless you have a microscope and know about the technology employed so you can reverse-engineer it. There is not much to driving simple LCDs.

If you can watch YouTube:
 

Athosworld

Member
You really need to at least get some cheap off-the-shelf modules and parts and start building and programming simple projects & gadgets, to get an understanding of parts that have similar functions to what you keep talking about, and the programming involved!
I got a parts kit and some microcontrollers.
 

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