• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Connecting TFT LCD to Computer

Status
Not open for further replies.
I've got a project where I need to connect a bunch of TFT LCDs (of varying sizes) to my computer. They will display information that I will output in a program that I'm writing. So effectively I need to turn these TFT LCDs into additional monitors to my computer.

Does anyone have any tutorials which talk about how to go about doing this?
 
I need to create monitors out of:

for example x4 LQ064V3DG06
x3 AA050MC01
x1 AA057VF12
x1 LQ084V1DG43

I'm not sure how much info each of these screens will have in terms of bandwidth, I haven't done the maths since I haven't completed the program yet, but to be honest, I think in terms of bandwidth, I don't see why a single video card won't be able to show all the info I'm trying to draw (don't ask me which one though). But I'm not sure how to go about connecting this many monitors to as little devices (video cards, computers) as possible.
 
Last edited:

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
additional monitors to my computer.
I think you want to drive several monitors at one time. (not happening)
When you say "X4, X3" do you want to run 4 and 3 of the same LCDs? (not happening)

What video board do you have? What is the output? "VGA" or HDMI/DVI or ?
1) You need an output for each LCD. I have some 4-head video cards but most are 2-head or 1-head.
I pull the data sheets on the first two LEDs.
Analog VGA will not work!
HDMI/DVI is a long way from what these LCDs need but I have done this.



You will also need a windows driver for these formats.

Here is a picture of a LCD driver board that converts a raw LCD into a PC monitor. You will need to have the board set up for what type of LCD you are using.

You might also look at this:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NJY2261-V1-...id=100337&rk=1&rkt=1&mehot=ag&sd=121969053222
 
Yes I need all 10 LCDs running at the same time.

From memory I have x1 DVI and x1 VGA but what I have now is irrelevant. I will be building a computer, network of computers until I get all 10 displays working but as I said, I would prefer as few separate computers as possible but sounds like this is not possible, at least without developing a completely custom solution which is obviously very complex and time consuming.

Sounds like I'll need basic video cards to drive the LCDs, but all the basic ones are AGP and I've never seen a motherboard with more than 1 AGP slot before so sounds like I'll need to get 10 old cheap computers to get this system working.

I pull the data sheets on the first two LEDs.
Analog VGA will not work!
Can you elaborate on this a little?

HDMI/DVI is a long way from what these LCDs need but I have done this.
Not sure what you mean by this statement.

Here is a picture of a LCD driver board that converts a raw LCD into a PC monitor. You will need to have the board set up for what type of LCD you are using.
The way I'm interpreting this is... you just provided an example of the type of board that I need, but not the exact one that will work for the displays that I mentioned?
 

Ian Rogers

User Extraordinaire
Forum Supporter
Most Helpful Member

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The way I'm interpreting this is... you just provided an example of the type of board that I need, but not the exact one that will work for the displays that I mentioned?
Yes, I do not have time to research. If you use one of this type of boards, they only work with certain sizes of displays. Some allow you to go in and make changes. One I looked at had 16 formats, only.

Years ago I designed several of these boards.

The LCDs you are looking at:
Data is "TTL" levels. So about 0 and 3 volts.
Colors are made up of many wires.
Example1: R0, R1, R2, R3, R4, R5, & G0, G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, & B0, B1, B2, B3, B4, B5, & Horizontal, Vertical, Clock
Example 2: R0-R7, G0-B7, B0-B7, H, V, C
So RED can be 4 or 5 or 6 or 7 or 8 wires.
The timing is important. Clock frequency=35mhz +/- 10%, H=31khz +/- 15%, V=60hz +/- 15%. Then there is issues of "blanking" time.
All these must be right.

I don't Windows is going to work with a resolution below 640x480. On this computer/video card I only have 11 formats.

Analog video (VGA):
There are three wires for video. (about 0 to 1 volt.) Where are 256 levels from 0 to 1 volts.
And then there is H and V.

Digital video:
The wires come in pairs. Data and not-Data (D, /D)
The voltage is about 1/2 volts.
Each data is Do, /D0, D1, /D1, D2, /D2, Clock, /Clock
Data is serial and very fast.
In one pixel time R0-R7, G0-G7, B0-B7, H, V, Blank are all sent over the three data wires.

---------------------------------------------------------
So what to do????
Think about this:
Here is a $35.00 computer. It can drive many different types of displays. There is a display port that drives many types of raw LCDs.
I think you will have some pin out problems. It should drive any of the "TTL" displays like you want.
I have one of these. I am using a digital TV or a PC-monitor. You can get these in a kit where the computer board is on the back of a LCD display. The computer talks LAN wired/wireless and USB so you can network them together. It can talk Windows 10 (light). I an using Unix.

So one PC could send commands to a huge bank of these boards.
This board has a 64 bit quad 1.2ghz computer. It does video very fast. Real time video. People do video games. I am using a single core 1ghz one as a PC. I run office and internet on this computer.

Ask question!
----edited------
I wish you were next door. I have not had much work this month. We could go to the lab and make things work.
 
Last edited:

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
On line there is a list of LCDs that the Raspberry 3 can talk to.
Many more will work by building an adapter. The pin out on the connector is the problem.
Good luck and tell me/us what you decide to do.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top