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component question...I need to elevate a switch off a PCB

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NewGeek

New Member
I have this switch I want to use, it is pcb mount, pushbutton. But it is smaller in height than other components on the board. I need it to be higher so that it can protrude through a hole in a faceplate which covers everything else. Is there some type of riser for PCB's that can raise the height of the component and maintain all electrical connections? (it needs to be rigid since I will be pushing on it).

Thanks
 

Styx

Active Member
How professional does it need to look?

How high does it need to be raised?

I would be tempted to use tinned-copper-wire coiled to make the right height and flood with solder
 

NewGeek

New Member
this is only a prototype right now, but eventually it will have to look "professional", so I might as well find the right part now.
This is a little clicker type switch similar to a cell phone button. It takes a bit of force to make it click, so it needs to be rigid.
It needs to be raised by approx 3/8".
Im thinking maybe maybe a DIP socket or something like that. Is there a 4 Pin DIP socket? the switch has 4 pins.
 

ChrisP

Member
There are several alternatives that are possible, but IMHO simpler is better. With that in mind, I would suggest using a nylon spacer tube of the correct length between the switch body and the PCB, and then simply extending the switch pins with wire or clipped-off component leads. The spacer tube can be epoxied or hot-glued in place to hold the switch right where you want it. :)
 

NewGeek

New Member
Yea, that was the best I came up with to (gluing a piece of plastic to the back of the switch and extending the leads). I was just wondering if there was a component specifically designed for this purpose. Im sure there is somwhere.
If I was to eventually produce more of these units though, gluing each piece wouldnt be viable.
 

ChrisP

Member
NewGeek said:
Yea, that was the best I came up with to (gluing a piece of plastic to the back of the switch and extending the leads). I was just wondering if there was a component specifically designed for this purpose. Im sure there is somwhere.
If I was to eventually produce more of these units though, gluing each piece wouldnt be viable.

Actually, that sort of thing is done in production more often than you might imagine. :)

As to other alternatives, have you considered something like the pin receptacles that Mill-Max offers? A DIP socket is OK if the switch leads are on standard 0.100" centers (or multiples thereof), but pin recptacles can be individually placed as and where they are needed. They are available in various lengths and body configurations for a fairly wide variety of lead sizes.
 

zevon8

New Member
Would it be possible to mount the switch on the reverse side of the PCB ?

You would only have to change the PCB layout if the switch had a non-symetrical layout.

I often do this with switches, especially when the switch is used as a mechanical mount for the PCB. Many times I will mount all LED's, switches and the like on one side of the PCB, everything else on the other.
 

McGuinn

New Member
Make a PCB platform for it. Suspend it on thick wire, using these as the electrical connections to the main PCB...

Code:
ASCII Art:

          -------     
         |        |                 >button
      ___|________|___              > PCB platform
      |              |
      |              |              >legs
==========================         > Main PCB.
 
I've done similar mods and repairs by using copper (soft) or brass (hard) micro-tubing. You can get many sizes at almost any good hobby shop. Both metals accept solder well and can be fashioned with simple hand tools. After cutting to the desired length, I'd stick a wire in one end, solder it to the PCB, wet the other end and solder the switch in place. Done.
 
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