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Choosing the 'best' PIC

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camerart

Active Member
Hi,
for years, my only projects used 16series 8 and 18 PIN PICs. I now have a project with a 40pin PIC. Having to read and familiarise yourself with the PIC you are using takes time, and to really know it, then it takes longer.

PICs with 28 pins usually are fine for most things I do now, and don't take up much space. I am just venturing into surface mount where PICs ar much smaller. I think I'll be ok with the SOIC footprint regarding soldering them.

I'm now considering using PIC with more pins (more expensive), for even simple projects, so that my programs are all compatible. they must be able to simulate in Oshonsoft, and be low voltage (3.3v) also surface mount.. One 28PIN and one 40PIN should cover it. One suggestion is 18F45K22
Any suggestions for your favourites welcome.

Cheers, Camerart
 

camerart

Active Member
Comes in a 28 pin as well... pic18f25k22..
Hi I,
I saw that! I'll see if anyone else has a different idea before ordering them, in case they use a similar but better PIC.
I'm just looking through the selections in M.A.P.S.
EDITED
C
 
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jjw

Member
For Android devices there is a free Picmicro database. Look in Google Playstore.

I find it easier to use than Microchips own.
It can filter by microchip families, package, number of pins, size of ram, flash, speed, peripherals etc.
 

camerart

Active Member
Hi,
As the 40pin version has a smaller footprint type than the 28 version I think I will go with 18LF25K22.
I think Oshonsoft ignores the 'L', for programming.
Thanks, C.
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi C,
Check thru this OS list first.
E
A001.gif
 

camerart

Active Member
hi C,
Check thru this OS list first.
E
View attachment 105382
Hi Eric,
Thanks, what a shame!

As a limited programmer, I guess that I should stick to the ones above the ********************* set of PICs.

If I recall correctly you wrote a section of code that got round the PWM limitations of the PIC I was using at the time, which is one of the items on the un-supported list. I doubt you would wish to do this for all of the other items :arghh:
C.
 
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camerart

Active Member
Hi
Having gone blue in the face using at the M.A.P.S. PIC selector while trying to find any system for microchip's mysterious numbering, I've slid down the pole back to ones that Eric chose some time ago: 18F2520 and 18F4520, or 18F2620 and 18F4620.

Slightly 'better' is 18LF26K22. These latter PIC's aren't shown in the Oshonsoft list, but would they program ok? The L is for lower voltage and I think the K shows more timers. The 40 pin type are not quite right as they don't have the SOIC footprint, they are smaller (Beyond my circuit making skills)
C
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi C,
The 18LF26K22 is listed on OS but it has the limitations I posted.

E
A003.gif
 

camerart

Active Member
Hi N, Sadly no.

Eric,
Ok, So it looks like 18F2620 and 18F4620 are the best we can do.
I doubt I will be doing anything too technical for them.
EDIT: I presume that the L is ok? As in 18LF2620.
Thanks, C.
 
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ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi,
The LF has a wider operating voltage
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A001.gif
 

ericgibbs

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
hi C,
Reminds me of the Oozlum bird.:woot:

The oozlum bird, also spelt ouzelum, is a legendary creature found in Australian and British folk tales and legends. Some versions have it that, when startled, the bird will take off and fly around in ever-decreasing circles until it manages to fly up its own backside, disappearing completely, which adds to its rarity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oozlum_bird
E
 

camerart

Active Member
hi C,
Reminds me of the Oozlum bird.:woot:

The oozlum bird, also spelt ouzelum, is a legendary creature found in Australian and British folk tales and legends. Some versions have it that, when startled, the bird will take off and fly around in ever-decreasing circles until it manages to fly up its own backside, disappearing completely, which adds to its rarity

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oozlum_bird
E
Hi Eric,
I'll try not to get startled then;)
C.
 
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