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Cant find datasheet or info for: 78DLO5AP

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I bought them in a lot with mixed components. I think they were used in aviation electronics, can anyone gimme the basics on them ? Thanks in advance, Jim
 

mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
it could be a 5V regulator chip
you may publish a well focused close up photo, so that some thought can be put on it.
 
I cant get a photo til tomorrow late, but this is what it looks like.
 

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This is what it looks like thumbnail didnt come up

Here is what I drew that looks like it
 

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mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
No Photo would be needed now. i am sure now it is a regulator.
If you study link below, it is evident that there are many devices in the same series
**broken link removed**
looking at the pattern, it is nothing but 5V regulator for positive voltages.
you can safely apply + 9 to +12V DEC at pins 1and pon2 (middle-common)
and you would get 5V DC at pin3 with ref to pin2. regarding current carrying capacity, if the the centre TAB is thick, it might take 1 amp load with tab mounted on a good heat sink

if the TAB is a thin sheet of copper, perhaps it could be 500mA version.
 

Boncuk

New Member
I found a data sheet "KIA78DL05F" (KIA motors)

The max current it can provide is 250mA. The "L" in the name points strongly to a low power device.

Try out max. current before use.

Boncuk
 

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mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
Thanks Boncuk !! for the information. othjerwise the OP would have tried loading 500mA if not 1 amp

Of course the device takes care of it/
 
Thanks everyone, so its like a small transformer but in electronic semi conductors its called a voltage regulator. apply 9V to pins 1-2 and on 3 I'll get a positive 5v...learn more and more every day
 
I have no idea what Im gonna use it for now maybe drive a 555 and 4017 strobing ten 3mm red led's ??? what does a small 3mm led draw ?? the heat sink threw me off, the other guy found data of max 250ma, thats not a lot at all..... JimΩ
 

mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
where ever you use 7805 for electronic projects you can use this
incidentally
it can derive 5V from just a 6V battery as long as input doesn't fall less than 5.6V DC. only limitation the output current is less than 250mA
that really enough for many small projects and as regulator in power adopters that deliver low currents.
LEDs are current devices
you need to put a series resistor in order to limit the current
the actual current is to be checked from the datasheet
In general efficient 3mm LEDs can work well at less than 10mA, say 5 to 8.
 
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Boncuk

New Member
Thanks Boncuk !! for the information. othjerwise the OP would have tried loading 500mA if not 1 amp

Of course the device takes care of it/

Hi mvs,

a fixed voltage regulator is the cheapest way to make a lamp flash.

Overload it and it will cut off the output until it regains normal operating temperature again. On - off (due to over temperature) - on again after cooling and so forth. :D

Kind regards

Hans
 
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mvs sarma

Well-Known Member
that would be fine but whether too harsh on the regulator , thus reducing its life.(blow hot , blow cold)
 

Boncuk

New Member
Not quite true!

I have overloaded such a regulator for 48 hours without any damage to it. It just switches off and on - off and on all over again.

You might decide about switch off cycle by dimensioning the heat sink accordingly. :)

To find out boundaries or borders you have to risk something. 50C for a voltage regulator is minimum risk. :D

I've seen many blown up circuits costing 100s of $$$$.

Regards

Hans
 
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Boncuk

New Member
That is what perhaps we can prevent in future
.

Don't do it! It's bad for the business!

Compare with China. They have no under employment and produce 10,000 tons of junk daily, exporting it all over the world and laugh their butts off about the stupid foreigners buying it.

Got it?
 
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audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Thermal cycling a part up to its very hot max allowed temperature then cooling it over and over causes thermal and mechanical fatigue that breaks the part.
 

Boncuk

New Member
Thermal cycling a part up to its very hot max allowed temperature then cooling it over and over causes thermal and mechanical fatigue that breaks the part.

Who cares? Do Chinese do it?
 
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