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Battery (input), solar cell (input), mains (input). light (output)

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by jasvinbindra, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. jasvinbindra

    jasvinbindra New Member

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    hiya everyone. I am fairly new to electronics so sorry if I am over complicating what I am saying. Ok, for school we need to create a light. I want my light to have a solar cell, battery and the mains as the input energy. Is there a way to make a circuit which when plugged into the mains, turns on the light and charges the battery at the same time, but when there isn't a power supply from the mains, it charges the battery using solar energy? In order to control which input power to use, I was thinking of using a switch.

    Here are the components I was going to use. I am not sure if the light will work.
    ~9v bulb
    ~20v solar cell
    -battery
    -3 way switch.


    So is all of the above possible or is it too far fetched for a beginner? If the components needed are wrong or not compatible could you please suggest other ideas. Any help would be very appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. JimB

    JimB Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    OK, let me just kick this about a bit first.

    Yes, it is very easy.

    Yes, that is easy also.
    But when using solar power, do you want the light to be on? Your specification does not state whether it does or not.
    Alternatively, why not charge the battery from solar and switch to charging from the mains when there is no sunlight?

    That is one way of doing it.
    Alternatively, you could use a few diodes.

    You don't mention the mains charger.
    Why a 9v lamp?
    Are you expecting to use a 9v battery as used to power a little radio?
    This may be OK for a demonstration piece, but not for a practical working system.

    Yes it is possible for a beginner, but as with most things - the devil is in the detail.

    If I were building this as a real project, there are things which I would do which I would not advocate for a beginner (like having the solar, switch the mains input for the charger).

    JimB
     
  3. jasvinbindra

    jasvinbindra New Member

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    Response : 'Alternatively, why not charge the battery from solar and switch to charging from the mains when there is no sunlight?'

    Answer : Yep thats exactly what I am looking for.




    Response: 'That is one way of doing it. Alternatively, you could use a few diodes'

    Answer: I'll stick to switches to make it easier.



    Response: 'You don't mention the mains charger.
    Why a 9v lamp?
    Are you expecting to use a 9v battery as used to power a little radio?
    This may be OK for a demonstration piece, but not for a practical working k system.'

    Answer: I dont know why I chose 9v. If possible could you recommend what l equipment to use in order to maximise efficiency.
     

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