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Are there any generators that produce little or no counter torque?

Thread starter #1
Maybe a silly question,

I understand that when an electrical load is placed on a generator, the generator produces a counter torque, thus requiring more power to maintain the rpm. I was just wondering are there any electrical generator designs that produce little or even no counter torque, or would this be considered an impossibility? Doesn't matter if AC or DC generator. Thanks guys.
 
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tcmtech

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#3
No. The production of "counter-torque' is the effect of the transfer of rotational energy from one part of they system to another that's receiving it.

No free lunch in power and energy transfers and conversions.
 

tcmtech

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#5
The internet is full of people with free lunch machines. also pills that make certain body parts longer. and roots that cure all kinds of sickness.
You found some of my Ex wifes browser history , didn't you? :p

but what do I know? According to her, at one point, I was a multi thousand year old human-alien hybrid being that was the only logical explanation she could come up with for me being smarter than her, given by her estimates, she was one of the smartest people in the world to have ever lived.

(seriously, there's no punchline here. It was an honest conversation we had multiple times and once even with her family as witnesses. ) :facepalm:
 

tcmtech

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#7
Wife, recently commented "You are not a perpetual motion machine."
"Get off that forum and do something."
Mine would sit across the room, on both her laptop plus cell phone doing god knows what online, and complain that I am sitting around online doing nothing of value.

Then to top it off, constantly ask me to look things up for her, as she sat there with two independant access points to the internet open and running.

Overunity seemed easier to understand and work with than that woman. :p
 

kinarfi

Well-Known Member
#8
Perpetual couch potato with laptop and phone comes to mind for me
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
#9
I understand that when an electrical load is placed on a generator, the generator produces a counter torque, thus requiring more power to maintain the rpm. I was just wondering are there any electrical generator designs that produce little or even no counter torque,
No.
or would this be considered an impossibility?.
Yes. And, we have math for that.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lenz's_law

ak
 

dr pepper

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#10
A generator with zero input torque would break 2 rules, one it would be a free energy or over unity device (not popular on this forum), and the other would be it would need to have zero friction bearings.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
#11
three laws of thermodynamics
1) there's no such thing as a free lunch
2) when you eat, you drop crumbs
3) ants eat the crumbs

if there were no back-torque, there's no work being done. that's how regenerative braking works on electric cars.
 
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dr pepper

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#13
I'll explain that to the mrs next when she's moaning about crumbs all over the couch.
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

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#14
I was just wondering are there any electrical generator designs that produce little or even no counter torque, or would this be considered an impossibility? Doesn't matter if AC or DC generator. Thanks guys.

It's called an analog tachometer. Speed proportional to voltage generated.

There is a common regulator used in cassette decks that that basically used Speed = k*Vm - Im*Rm; When Im = 0; speed is proportional to Vm.

That little generator doesn't generate power and it still has thermal losses.
 

dr pepper

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#15
To answer your question Nj yes the concept would be considered impossible, such a device would be an over-unity or free energy machine.

This is probably irrelevant in this situation however there is one situation where a gen would have very low or zero torque, and that would be if it had a voltage applied to it that overcome the friction & losses in the gen, however if this happened the gen would then be a motor, in industry you often see braking resistors on motor drives to dissipate energy when the motor brakes the load, ie the other way round a motor becomes a generator.
 

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