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Arduino Rains Sensor/Alarm

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spec

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Welcome boblalux,

Care to tell us which part of France you are from and put it next to 'Location' on your user page so that your location is displayed in your user window at the left of your posts.

Can you describe a bit more about you rain sensor set-up? Is the rain sensor shield and Arduino located outside and battery powered.

spec
 

boblalux

New Member
Welcome boblalux,

Care to tell us which part of France you are from and put it next to 'Location' on your user page so that your location is displayed in your user window at the left of your posts.
Done

Can you describe a bit more about you rain sensor set-up? Is the rain sensor shield and Arduino located outside and battery powered.

spec
Check http://www.bobscardmodels.altervista.org/page5.htm again - I have added a pici of the set-up as it is now temporarily. As I said, I wish to put the sensor (left) outside, with some sort of wireless link-up to the rest (batteries and buzzer) which should be inside my house.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Welcome to ETO.

I wish to put the sensor (left) outside, with some sort of wireless link-up to the rest (batteries and buzzer) which should be inside my house.
This could become complicated very quickly.

For the radio link, some of the 433MHz modules would be the obvious choice, but the problem comes in interfacing the sensor to the radio module.
I do not see any details of the circuit board, but my first thought is that it should be next to the rain sensor to detect the change in resistance due to the rain. An output from the circuit board could then connect to the transmitter.
The output from the receiver could connect to the buzzer.

However, it may be necessary to use a microcontroller (Arduino or PIC) to make a sensible interface to the radio modules.
This is not a quick connect it up and go type project.


On a slightly different topic, I have visited Mulhouse in Alsace. Great museums, the "Schlumpf", the railway museum and the electricity museum.

JimB
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Welcome to ETO.


This could become complicated very quickly.

For the radio link, some of the 433MHz modules would be the obvious choice, but the problem comes in interfacing the sensor to the radio module.
I do not see any details of the circuit board, but my first thought is that it should be next to the rain sensor to detect the change in resistance due to the rain. An output from the circuit board could then connect to the transmitter.
The output from the receiver could connect to the buzzer.

However, it may be necessary to use a microcontroller (Arduino or PIC) to make a sensible interface to the radio modules.
This is not a quick connect it up and go type project.


On a slightly different topic, I have visited Mulhouse in Alsace. Great museums, the "Schlumpf", the railway museum and the electricity museum.

JimB
That was my feeling too. Also there is the complication of the power source for the rain sensor and RF transmitter: battery perhaps.

Also, how would the transmitter work. Would it simply transmit while it was raining and if so would heavy rain prevent reception. The alternative is to transmit when there is no rain but this would seem to be the wrong way around. I suppose the transmitter could transmit a short burst every minute or so when it is not raining.

On a slightly different topic, I haven't been to Alsace but would love to.:)

spec
 
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JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
how would the transmitter work. Would it simply transmit while it was raining
My best guess is that the micro controller would be in sleep mode most of the time, maybe send an "I am OK" message every few minutes, and an alarm message as soon as the rain sensor get wet.

would heavy rain prevent reception
As the range is probably a few 10s of metres, even a torrential downpour would not make a noticeable difference.

On a slightly different topic, I haven't been to Alsace but would love to.
A diversion during a holiday to Germany, I wanted to visit the Bugatti museum in Mulhouse. And guess what, it was closed on Tuesdays! So the late Mrs JimB and I spent a happy day touring around the Vosges region by Mulhouse and Colmar, and went to the museum on Wednesday.
Boblalux, sorry for the thread hijack. As a Moderator I will reprimand myself!

JimB
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
In view of what Jim said in post #6 above about RF reception being OK in rain, below is a rough outline block diagram of a remote rain detection system purely as an opening gambit for discussion/refinement.

spec

2016_08_16_!ss1_ETO_RAIN_DETECTOR.png
 
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spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Hy boblalux,

It would be handy for us to know what facilities and skills you have so that we can answer your request in an appropriate way:
(1) Do you understand electronics: fundamental circuit theory. Know about fundamental components: resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors, integrated circuits
(2) Do you have the fundamental electronics tools: soldering iron, miniature pliers and wire cutters.
(3) Do you have the fundamental test equipment: digital multimeter, power supply
(4) Do you have fundamental construction skills: soldering, sawing, filing
(5) Are you able to configure and do elementary programing of an Arduino microcontroller?

Apologies for asking all these questions in such a direct and clinical way. Although it sounds like an inquisition, it is only intended to be constructive and give you the best answer.:)

spec
 

boblalux

New Member
Hy boblalux,

It would be handy for us to know what facilities and skills you have so that we can answer your request in an appropriate way:
(1) Do you understand electronics: fundamental circuit theory. Know about fundamental components: resistors, capacitors, inductors, transistors, integrated circuits NOT MUCH
(2) Do you have the fundamental electronics tools: soldering iron, miniature pliers and wire cutters. YES
(3) Do you have the fundamental test equipment: digital multimeter, power supply YES
(4) Do you have fundamental construction skills: soldering, sawing, filing YES
(5) Are you able to configure and do elementary programing of an Arduino microcontroller? NO

Apologies for asking all these questions in such a direct and clinical way. Although it sounds like an inquisition, it is only intended to be constructive and give you the best answer.:)

spec
OK, as you see, it will have to be very simple! No problem with electrics, but electronics .........

I have updated the link http://www.bobscardmodels.altervista.org/page5.htm so you will perhaps see part of the set-up.
I don't need the rain alarm to be on permamently, but if my wife has the washing on the line, or I am drying lavender blossom outside etc, I can turn it on, go to sleep with the buzzer portion next to my ear!!

Yes, the Alsace region is wonderful gastronomically, hill-wise, and being close to Strasbourg, reasonably international. Having lived for years working for mining companies in southern Africa, it can reasonably be called paradise.
Bugatti museum is just down the road (50km), and if I had the cash, perhaps I would try to buy an old-timer. But I DON4T;

Bob
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
OK, as you see, it will have to be very simple! No problem with electrics, but electronics .........

I have updated the link http://www.bobscardmodels.altervista.org/page5.htm so you will perhaps see part of the set-up.
I don't need the rain alarm to be on permanently, but if my wife has the washing on the line, or I am drying lavender blossom outside etc, I can turn it on, go to sleep with the buzzer portion next to my ear!!
Thx, that information helps a lot both about your facilities and skills. The way that you plan to use the system also helps greatly.:)

Yes, the Alsace region is wonderful gastronomically, hill-wise, and being close to Strasbourg, reasonably international. Having lived for years working for mining companies in southern Africa, it can reasonably be called paradise.
Bugatti museum is just down the road (50km), and if I had the cash, perhaps I would try to buy an old-timer. But I DON4T;
I am feeling slightly envious.:rolleyes:

spec
 
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