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Adding my PC as a TV channel at home (extisting TV cable)

When do you think Harddisk Videorecording will become very popular?

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DJ_F3

New Member
Hi,
I would like to add the video output from my PC to the cable that enters my house (non-digital). This would enable me to watch regular TV + my PC everywhere in my house.
Now I have a direct video link between my PC and one TV. Do you have any idea how this can be done? Even experts on this subject have not been able to tell me how it would work.

I'm not a technician so retail products would be best for me :). On www.palmbutler.com you'll find products that do what I'm looking for but this costs Euro399 :-(

Tnx!
bye
DJ
 

crust

Member
What you want is a modulator that replaces an existing channel with the signal from your TV. Look at products by ChannelPlus, particularly the 5500 series. If you are using a cable box, you will probably have to make the modulator output onto a channel which is normally analog (the low numbered ones).
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Or even cheaper, just use an old VCR as a modulator - feed the sound and vision into it's direct inputs, switch the VCR to AV, and feed the incoming aerial through the VCR's aerial sockets.

It's a bit 'big and ugly', but you can't beat the price (I'm throwing a big heap of duff VCR's out tomorrow, I'm sure most people could come across one fairly easily - and you could always practice with your existing VCR first).
 

jem

Member
Presumably, you have a TV-compatible baseband output from your video card. You also have to feed the output from your sound card for the sound.

What Nigel is describing would work, except that you cannot use your TV to tune to a cable channel or PC-Video out, you have to use the VCR remote to switch back and forth. If your PC video out is located some distance from the VCR (and presumably your TV set as well which has to be fairly close to the output of the VCR), the baseband signal will not carry well.
 

crust

Member
What Nigel suggests would work, but VCRs typically only output on 3 or 4, dont know where you are, but in Austin, TX those are the major networks on cable. Secondly, the channelplus modulators attempt to notch filter the incoming signal at the desired frequency and then replace it with your baseband signal. In effect you can "take out" channel 14 and replace it with whatever you want. Most of the modulators work up to channel 60 or something like that.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
crust said:
What Nigel suggests would work, but VCRs typically only output on 3 or 4, dont know where you are, but in Austin, TX those are the major networks on cable. Secondly, the channelplus modulators attempt to notch filter the incoming signal at the desired frequency and then replace it with your baseband signal. In effect you can "take out" channel 14 and replace it with whatever you want. Most of the modulators work up to channel 60 or something like that.

As you say, he doesn't mention where he is, but in the UK modern VCR modulators cover channels 21-69 - the entire UHF band.
 

tom2000

New Member
333

Nigel Goodwin said:
As you say, he doesn't mention where he is, but in the UK modern VCR modulators cover channels 21-69 - the entire UHF band.

Here we have another reason why not to live in the UK. lol

first the bad driving habits and now the vcr tunners...

why do those english have to be so different from the rest of us
 

panic mode

Well-Known Member
well when I first came to north america, I was shocked to find out that
you cannot rearrange TV channels at will. it is "hardcoded" by your local
cable provider. all you can do is ignore certain channel(s) but there is no
way to make HBO nr1, CNN nr20 or whatever... I want to be able to scroll
back and fourth through my five favourite channels using single button!

another thing - there is no teletext (&#%&@#)???

Thank god I have internet... 8)
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Re: 333

tom2000 said:
why do those english have to be so different from the rest of us

Because we did it first :lol:

The UK had the worlds first TV system, well before the USA. As a result of this we ended up with 405 lines on VHF band I and band III. Later on the USA used 525 lines, again on VHF (as far as I know).

Now while the USA were stuck with the crappy NTSC colour system (because they did commercial colour TV first), the UK were stuck with B/W 405 line TV.

The solution was to move to the modern UHF band, which gives a great deal more bandwidth - this was done in stages, with the first programme being the new BBC2 - which appeared early/mid-60's. All programmes on UHF have always been 625 line, getting ready for colour to start. In 1969 the other two channels BBC1 and ITV joined BBC2 on UHF, and three programme colour started in the UK. The early colour sets were dual-standard, you watched BBC1 and ITV in 405 line, black and white, and BBC2 in 625 line colour (at least the few programmes that were available in colour).

The two services ran in parallel for many years, and eventually the old VHF service was shut down.

So in the UK we have:

1) A modern all UHF TV system (now also with the worlds first digital terrestrial service as well).

2) We have high quality PAL colour, instead of crap NTSC.

3) High quality digital stereo NICAM sound.

4) Teletext.
 

Noggin

Member
Re: 333

Nigel Goodwin said:
The UK had the worlds first TV system, well before the USA. As a result of this we ended up with 405 lines on VHF band I and band III. Later on the USA used 525 lines, again on VHF (as far as I know).

Yeah, well here in the US we have 18 blades on our razors. I bet you just now got that 4 blade one that really sucks, but you probably get by fine with the Mach 3. Razors don't start getting good until around 9 blades or so
 

Noggin

Member
sorry i got off topic :oops:
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Re: 333

Noggin said:
Yeah, well here in the US we have 18 blades on our razors. I bet you just now got that 4 blade one that really sucks, but you probably get by fine with the Mach 3. Razors don't start getting good until around 9 blades or so

You haven't seen me :lol: what's a 'razor'?.
 
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