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a remote control using a pic

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
been contemplating this for some time and wonder if Swordfish has a module or?
All I find is using an Arduino.
tried accessing the Swordfish site using another computer (Nortons won't let me access site)
I want to store the hex values in EEProm for later use.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
been contemplating this for some time and wonder if Swordfish has a module or?
All I find is using an Arduino.
tried accessing the Swordfish site using another computer (Nortons won't let me access site)
I want to store the hex values in EEProm for later use.
I'm just doing that to control PWM of a remote motor or LED power supply. I'm using ESP8266 and allowing web interface to set the number or speed/brightness steps and the PWM value of each of those steps.
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
been contemplating this for some time and wonder if Swordfish has a module or?
Not really, but it depends on what you mean by "a remote control using pic".

There are lots of different types of "remote control". What are you looking to do?
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
am contemplating on going to an Arduino as there are lots more support than Swordfish
No problem, I know my skill level is sub par
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
that sounds about right
I think I saw a thread where your switching gears and going with Ardunio?
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Save yourself a lot of grief, and buy a learning remote. The picture shows just a few types available on Amazon – you can get them as simple or complex as you want.

You should be able to find an Uno for far less than $23. I believe you would have an extremely tough go of understanding Arduino code and Arduino forums don't seem to be tolerant of providing the level of help you typically need.

20201222_094557.jpg
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
am contemplating on going to an Arduino as there are lots more support than Swordfish
I can't see this ending well.

The Arduino is relatively "easy to use" as long as all you have to do is follow instructions for a pre-built project.
Other than that, it's WAY beyond your level of expertise.

If you have trouble following some of the concepts in Swordfish BASIC you'll never get C++, which is what the Arduino uses.
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
well am looking at a book on C/C++ as well as an Ardunio kit. Found varying prices etc.
got to do something and won't get anywhere unless I try.
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
got to do something and won't get anywhere unless I try.
Well, you could save yourself some money and learn how to use what you already have.

Learn how to use things like subroutines and functions, passing parameters, global vs local variables, etc.
All of those concepts are used in all modern languages.

Instead, we end up with pages and pages of posts going over the same "if... then" and how to blink an led.
I can't think of a project yet that doesn't do almost the exact same thing as the last, yet it takes 20-30 pages each time.
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
my next project is totally different and yet to see any code in Swordfish that deals with an IR emitter/ detector for reading a tv remote
here is a link to book I am looking at purchasing
 

MrDEB

Well-Known Member
one must realize I basically have no programming experience but getting better at it.
Been tweeking my drag race game with basically no issues
 

tumbleweed

Active Member
and yet to see any code in Swordfish that deals with an IR emitter/ detector for reading a tv remote
My point exactly.

If you understood the concepts and how the hardware works, you could look at other examples and figure it out yourself.
Instead, because you don't, you're looking for a ready-made solution that you can copy-paste without understanding what it does, and add a blinking LED to it.

There are probably millions of Arduino sketches out there to read an IR signal. Good luck.
For someone who has a hard time with the basic concepts of a programming language, C++ is gonna twist your brain something fierce.
When you figure out what a constructor does I'll be long dead.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
I have been using the Arduino IDE – not for run of the mill Arduino boards, but for advanced boards like the ESP8266 (with built-in wifi) and the ESP32 (with wifi and Bluetooth). And I struggle with it. I can't start with a blank screen and go to working code without looking up dozens of things.

The standard Arduino boards are pretty much equivalent to the PIC18Fs you've been using. They don't bring anything new to the table feature-wise, at the burden of a more complex programming language. Perhaps they suit your cut&paste programming ¿programming style? But without understanding the language, you'll just dig deeper holes.

If there's no convincing you, you might consider using ESP32s – it's the same Arduino language on a more advanced microcontroller. Of course, you'll have to figure out how to add a different board to the Arduino IDE (which isn't hard but does require following ALL the steps in the directions.
 

Dr_Doggy

Well-Known Member
one of my first was a receiver for a specific tv remote to run a duct taped robot, rip the 40khz ir reciever(i bought 10$ tsop.. nice smooth digital output much easier), and tie it to a pin, i used a pic 16 or 18 i think, first write code for a read loop (hint, read delay times between on an off, but have a large buffer waiting, in my remote the strings were several bytes for the device code and several bytes for the command, after good reads , start reading other buttons and you will be able to resolve the hex commands.
from there, compress and save...
spitting back out is almost just LED on a pin, but you need to vibrate the 40k carrier, aswell as the I/O time, i ended up using a flasher circuit tuned at 40k and powered the flasher from pic output

But the first thing to check is the carrier frequency of the remote you are trying to get in to
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
one of my first was a receiver for a specific tv remote to run a duct taped robot, rip the 40khz ir reciever(i bought 10$ tsop.. nice smooth digital output much easier), and tie it to a pin, i used a pic 16 or 18 i think, first write code for a read loop (hint, read delay times between on an off, but have a large buffer waiting, in my remote the strings were several bytes for the device code and several bytes for the command, after good reads , start reading other buttons and you will be able to resolve the hex commands.
from there, compress and save...
spitting back out is almost just LED on a pin, but you need to vibrate the 40k carrier, aswell as the I/O time, i ended up using a flasher circuit tuned at 40k and powered the flasher from pic output

But the first thing to check is the carrier frequency of the remote you are trying to get in to
It's of little consequence - they are almost all near enough to work regardless, with the centre generally about 38KHz - using the wrong TSOP just reduced your range from vastly too far, to much too far. If you stick to 38KHz it works with pretty well anything.

The main exception was old B&O gear, which rather bizarrely used 100KHz, but that was back before TSOP's.
 

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