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Wiring up a IEC320 C14 socket

logiwan992

New Member
So I just bought this socket on ebay.
qTzsJrVl.jpg 85iiBsZl.jpg

I have never wired anything like this up before so I'm looking for some guidance. I found this post to help me along, but they only talk about wiring without a fuse. http://www.electro-tech-online.com/threads/help-with-wiring-up-a-iec320-c14-socket.122625/

From what I can tell this is how I would expect to wire it with a fuse.
Edmt6qyl.png
Does this look correct?

Also since I have never done this before I'm not sure what type of wires to use. And can I just solder the wires on or do I need to use special connectors? Any guidance on this subject would be greatly appreciated. Thanks far any and all help.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
You do not tell us where in the world you are, so I have drawn the wiring using the UK colours.
Also, your wiring diagram does not display for some reason.
JimB
 

Attachments

logiwan992

New Member
Thanks for the response Jim. Your diagram looks exactly like mine. Thank you for confirming that aspect of my question.
 

logiwan992

New Member
Neither look correct to me. Is the switch illuminated? It looks like the top right pair of tabs are connected to the neon bulb, which makes the switch SPST. This switch should be connected in series with the fuse, from the live/active/hot wire. The neutral wire should connect to the neutral tab. The neon should be connected between the neutral and the switched active (before the fuse); I assume no resistor is required for the neon, though this may not be the case.
Could you possibly draw a diagram of this for me? I am having trouble picturing it.
 

logiwan992

New Member
So I just noticed this information on the ebay product page.

Description:
  • 3 pin IEC320 C14 plug, 7 terminals, built in a red light bulb DPST rocker switch, is used widely in lab equipment, medical devices, fitness equipment, industrial automation equipment, etc.
  • Use only with a 250V fuse(fuse not included here).

Notice the DPST. Does this change what your diagram would look like dougy83?
 

dougy83

Well-Known Member
Notice the DPST. Does this change what your diagram would look like dougy83?
Yes, very much so. It changes it to be exactly what you had in your first post, and JimB showed also.
 

logiwan992

New Member
So it turns out that it is to my benefit to swap which side of the switch the L and N wires are on. This would be my new setup if I did this.
EO87X7Vl.jpg
Does this still work or will there be an unexpected problem? Thanks for any replies.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Drawn in isolation like that, it is fine.

Depending on the load, if it is critical which is line and which is neutral, there could be a problem. But as far as the connector goes, it does not care.

In reply to the second question in your original post, yes just solder the wires to the terminals. No special connector needed at all.

JimB
 

logiwan992

New Member
Drawn in isolation like that, it is fine.

Depending on the load, if it is critical which is line and which is neutral, there could be a problem. But as far as the connector goes, it does not care.

In reply to the second question in your original post, yes just solder the wires to the terminals. No special connector needed at all.

JimB
Thanks for the reply. My question was in reference to just the connector. Getting the wires to the correct position after the switch worked better with them in that position.

Do you know what type of fuse I need to use with this? It says it requires a 250V fuse. Does the amperage matter? And what is the difference between fast blow and slow blow?
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Do you know what type of fuse I need to use with this?
That depends on what load you have.

It says it requires a 250V fuse.
Fuses have a voltage rating as well as a current rating.
If you used a 12volt fuse in 240volt circuit, when the fuse blows it is likely there will be a sustained arc which can do a lot of damage to the fuseholder and equipment.
So here you should use a 250v 20mm fuse. (Usually is 20mm in these things, but do check first).

Does the amperage matter?
Yes.
If your load draws 3 amps, you would not want to use a 1 amp fuse, it would soon blow. A 5 amp fuse may be a good choice in that case.

And what is the difference between fast blow and slow blow?
Fuse ratings are complicated, have a look here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuse_(electrical)
A slow blow fuse will allow short term overloads (a few seconds) without blowing the fuse.
A quick blow fuse responds very quickly to the overload.

JimB
 
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