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Which MCU brand is used in production the most?

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
I am wondering which brand i should learn. I used to work with atmels, i dont like arduino honestly ( I used atmel studio).
I know you guys are mostly programmers so if you can me suggest what should i choose to work with.
ARM / PIC / Atmel / fpga (well fpga is probably to much powerful =D ) ...
Which brand has the best outlook for the future?
Thanks
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Well FPGA isn't a processor :D

The MicroChip PIC is the most popular from a single manufacturer, and you see them in all kinds of devices - most popular from multiple manufacturers is the rather antique 8051 (it seems to be taught a lot in India, where presumably they are still using very old equipment in their Universities?).

Really it depends on what you need to do, and choose between types based on which facilities you require.

Mostly though it doesn't really matter that much - as long as you program them from C, as it's relatively simply to move code from one to another.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I would guess it depends on what you intend doing. Low level toaster/microwave type device, probably Pic. Missile guidance systems, probably ARM, but I could do it with a Pic :cool: .

Mike.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My personal favourite it the PIC series as well, either the DSPIC33EP series for serious projects or PIC18 for simpler stuff.

For info, a suitably large FPGA can be programmed to replicate the functions of many older CPUs - everything from old mainframes and minicomputers through dozens or hundreds of microprocessors.

You can think of them as thousands or millions of logic gates with programmable interconnections; so any logic circuit (including CPUs) that fits within the available gate and interconnect limits can be duplicated.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
I would guess it depends on what you intend doing. Low level toaster/microwave type device, probably Pic. Missile guidance systems, probably ARM, but I could do it with a Pic :cool: .

Mike.
I am interested in power electronics so basic measurements and control.
I am not much into digital electronics and IOT.
Do you think some ARM (mcu in general) can substitute PWM IC chip for smps?
I think it will has better algorithm than normal IC like tl494...
 

ronsimpson

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you think some ARM (mcu in general) can substitute PWM IC chip for smps?
I think it will has better algorithm than normal IC like tl494...
The TL494 was started in 1982 or 83. The ARM, from the factory, has no algorithm. That's for you to add.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you think some ARM (mcu in general) can substitute PWM IC chip for smps?
Most processors today can do PWM as part of their peripherals. They are adding more and more capability to single chip processors daily. Eventually, a single chip will be able to do everything. Learn a language, not a processor.

Mike.
 

tomizett

Active Member
Microchip make some special-purpose microcontrollers for SMPS control, with various analogue and mixed-signal functions built in. Sadly I don't have part numbers off the top of my head. They might be of interest to you.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
The TL494 was started in 1982 or 83. The ARM, from the factory, has no algorithm. That's for you to add.
I know its old and i know someone needs to write code first :).
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
Most processors today can do PWM as part of their peripherals. They are adding more and more capability to single chip processors daily. Eventually, a single chip will be able to do everything. Learn a language, not a processor.

Mike.
Only thing i am aware is reaction time of mcu for smps purpose. It should have fast adc enough. But i dont plan to have mcu for smps control. I am just curious :)
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Only thing i am aware is reaction time of mcu for smps purpose. It should have fast adc enough.
The DSPIC33EP series I mentioned have ADC sampling to either 500KHz or 1MHz, depending on the resolution you need (10 bit or 12 bit).

Unless you are running extremely high PWM frequencies, ADC update rates would not be an issue. And the "motor" PWM modules have such as current trip capability that kills the output if it exceeds a set point.

Microchip provide libraries and examples for various types of PSU setup.

The DSPICs are overkill for many applications - some of the PIC16 series can easily control some types of switched mode PSU, eg. see this example.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
I would guess it depends on what you intend doing. Low level toaster/microwave type device, probably Pic. Missile guidance systems, probably ARM, but I could do it with a Pic :cool: .
Actually an old friend of mine, who I've not seen for years, was employed writing software for guided missiles :D

I've no idea what was used, but I presume it was micro-processor as it long predated micro-controllers.
 

simonbramble

Active Member
PICs are used widely by the hobbyist market, but they have been surpassed by the STM32 from ST.COM. This is *by far* the most popular micro I come across on my travels to various different customers
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
Thanks everyone i think i will stick with STM only due price tag.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
Very likely those missile guidance computers were full of ceramic ICs with military grade operating ranges.
I just today saw a jet in the morning. Luckily just the jet, no missile... =)
 

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