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What is your room temperature at home?

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MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
It might take hours for the temperature of my home to drop down to 20 degrees C at night for the furnace to turn back on in winter.
If the gas boiler is switched off, our room temperature will currently drop by approx. 2 degrees overnight.
 

fourtytwo

Active Member
If the gas boiler is switched off, our room temperature will currently drop by approx. 2 degrees overnight.
Sounds like either the inside/outside temperature differential is minimal or you have stonking good insulation, or of course you could have a very short sleep!!
We have just about begun on frosts now (in the UK), 2C last night and getting colder. We use our wood burner in the evenings, still no central heating BUT due to lots of cloud the last week or so we have had to use the furnace/boiler in the mornings for hot water (that's normally provided by solar).
It's very enlightening finding out how much other people heat there homes :)
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
Sounds like either the inside/outside temperature differential is minimal or you have stonking good insulation, or of course you could have a very short sleep!!
We have just about begun on frosts now (in the UK), 2C last night and getting colder. We use our wood burner in the evenings, still no central heating BUT due to lots of cloud the last week or so we have had to use the furnace/boiler in the mornings for hot water (that's normally provided by solar).
It's very enlightening finding out how much other people heat there homes :)
Insulation is really, really bad so thats not the case.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What are you guys boiling? My furnace burns natural gas to heat the air in my home. It blows the warm air around everywhere inside. My natural gas fueled hot water tank heats the water for washing things. I use a natural gas fueled fireplace sometimes that looks like it is burning fake wood. The stove is electric.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
What are you guys boiling? My furnace burns natural gas to heat the air in my home. It blows the warm air around everywhere inside. My natural gas fueled hot water tank heats the water for washing things. I use a natural gas fueled fireplace sometimes that looks like it is burning fake wood. The stove is electric.
Smoking sausages with gas from russia.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What are you guys boiling?
Most European systems have a "boiler" (furnace) that heats water, and that in turn is circulated to radiators where needed.
Usually just two 15mm (1/2", before metrification) pipes to the radiators, rather than large air ducts.

This is like mine; the external connections are a gas pipe, two water pipes, a control cable and a small condensate drain pipe, plus a 4" coaxial "flue" for air inlet and exhaust:

This is a typical style radiator, though there are many different shapes and sizes:

Some places have underfloor heat instead of radiators, either an array of pipe set in the flooring or electrically heated film under the covering.
 

MacIntoshCZ

Active Member
Most European systems have a "boiler" (furnace) that heats water, and that in turn is circulated to radiators where needed.
Usually just two 15mm (1/2", before metrification) pipes to the radiators, rather than large air ducts.

This is like mine; the external connections are a gas pipe, two water pipes, a control cable and a small condensate drain pipe, plus a 4" coaxial "flue" for air inlet and exhaust:

This is a typical style radiator, though there are many different shapes and sizes:

Some places have underfloor heat instead of radiators, either an array of pipe set in the flooring or electrically heated film under the covering.
Oh, i though that is clear what boiler stands for. And i though that audioguru was asking what we are cooking (with ironic inside house, no in kitchen...) :D. Thats funny
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Houses in Canada used water boiler furnaces hundreds of years ago before my time and burned coal or oil. Now most homes have high efficiency furnaces that bring in cold outside air for the natural gas burner and the exhaust pipe gets warm not hot. The air inside the home is heated and blown though air ducts and there are cold air return ducts.
The air ducts are between rafters, under a floor or are inside walls so they take up no space.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
My house in Australia used a heat pump to heat/cool it throughout the year, known as reverse cycle air-conditioning. It used ducted air to move the heat/cold throughout the house. I now live in an apartment that also uses reverse cycle aircon. Just different horses for different courses.

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Having lived in both the UK and Australia, my heating (and cooling in Australia) are/were completely different hence my comment "horses for courses". I'm guessing cooling is not a requirement in Canada.

Mike.
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm guessing cooling is not a requirement in Canada.
Canada is huge and hardly anybody lives in the North with Polar Bears.
I live near where the Canada/USA border is more southerly than average and the temperatures are moderate. In the 3 months of summer the temperature is often higher than 30 degrees C so of course air conditioners are used. Today on Nov 17 the temperature should be 6 degrees C but instead it will be 14 degrees C with rain. Snow has not occurred this winter yet and some will come in December. The snow depth will be 7cm a few times in winter. The temperatures in January and February will average -3 degrees C daytime and -10 degrees C nighttime. Once I was in the middle of Canada where the temperature was -45 degrees C in daytime.

Hee, hee. I'm guessing that everything is upside-down in down under, mate.;)
 

Tony Stewart

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I'm used to cold and sweat easily and my wife is used to warm so 23'C is our compromise. But the reality is how we feel is due to the wet bulb temp, which no thermostat measures. Insulation improves with lower RH and degrades with high RH so how we feel depends greater on wet bulb temp than dry bulb. Yet poor double pane Pd windows in winter create gradient drafts to break down insulation and can create more discomfort . So 3rd pane with heat stretch wrap of removable frame inserts work well for us.
 
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