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What is this called?

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Noam Genet

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What is an outlet like this called? I want to use a converter so I can charge my phone or convert this to a standard outlet. I'm pretty sure it's 24 v, and want to be able to convert it to 12. Any help??
 

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Les Jones

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It looks like an SO-259 (sometimes called a UHF connector.) These normaly have a serated edge on the threaded part so I may be wrong. There is nothing in your picture to give a sense of scale. The threaded part of an SO-259 socket is about 5/8" diameter. Even if it is not an SO-259 connector, being coaxial it will almost certainly be used for radio frequency connections with coaxial cable. It is very unlikely to be used for 24 volts.

Les.
 

JimB

Super Moderator
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It looks like an SO-259 (sometimes called a UHF connector.)
I disagree with that.
While the picture is a bit dark and difficult to see detail, there are several features which are different from a UHF type connector.
Have a look at these:

SO239 002.JPG
The dielectric fills the space between the centre pin and the body, the serrated edge is clearly visible.

The picture from the OP does not have these features.
Whether it is used for a DC supply? Who knows, I certainly do not.

Also, a bit of terminology...
The correct designation for the socket, as shown here in my picture is SO239, and the corresponding plug is PL259.

JimB
 

AnalogKid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Agree with Jim. It might be a version of a MIL circular connector, such as a 38999 variant, but again I don't remember those having a gap between the female insert and the shell inside wall.

ak
 

cowboybob

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Welcome to ETO, NG!

Some more pix to better show the context of the connectors would be useful, i.e., what sort of device are they attached to (mechanically and electrically)?
 

JLNY

Active Member
The correct designation for the socket, as shown here in my picture is SO239, and the corresponding plug is PL259.
Actually, although HAMs and hobbyists like to refer to UHF connectors as SO-239s and PL-259s as a generic term for the interface, that is technically incorrect. IIRC, the actual military designation for SO-239 specifically refers to a 4-hole flange panel-mount socket to a solder cup in the back, and PL-259 refers to a straight solder plug for RG-8 cable. Anything else is technically not an SO-239 or a PL-259. In the connector industry they are generally just referred to as UHF connectors.

As for the OP's connector, it is hard to tell the scale without a size reference, but it looks like some variant of a UHF connector, possibly with the insulator carved out around the outside for better 50-Ohm matching at high frequency. I would try seeing if a male UHF will mate to it. Another easy test if a UHF plug is unavailable would be to see if a banana plug will fit into the socket-- The female contact on a UHF connector is sized such that a banana plug will fit into it.
 

JimB

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the actual military designation for SO-239 specifically refers to a 4-hole flange panel-mount socket to a solder cup in the back, and PL-259 refers to a straight solder plug for RG-8 cable.
Interesting, I did not know that the PL259/SO239 designation was so specific.
I thought that it defined the connection interface in all its mechanical mounting arrangements, in the same way that BNC or "N" defines the connection interface and the mechanical mounting is separately specified.

JimB
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It is a solenoid.
The left side shows a coil with a core and the right side shops a magnet.
 

RichTheDude

Active Member
It is Ghostbusters 2. I will take condiments for $800!
 

audioguru

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Most Helpful Member
Then the RF connector on the right side that is in the dark must have its cover removed.
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
What is an outlet like this called? I want to use a converter so I can charge my phone or convert this to a standard outlet. I'm pretty sure it's 24 v, and want to be able to convert it to 12. Any help??
Hi Noam,

Which part of Israel are you at? By the way, if you put it next to 'Location' on your user page it will show in the box at the left of your posts. Knowing your location helps us give answers to your questions.

Here are a few questions for you. At present we do not have enough information to help you.

(1) You say you want to charge your phone. What type of phone is that? Please give a description and model number.

(2) You say you think the connectors have 12V or 24V on them. Can you find out what voltage the connectors do have on them. Also is it DC or AC.

(3) As the other members have implied, we would need to identify the connector type so that we can specify a mating connector. Can you investigate the connector type? Perhaps take a picture of the contacts.

spec
 
Last edited:

JLNY

Active Member
Interesting, I did not know that the PL259/SO239 designation was so specific.
I thought that it defined the connection interface in all its mechanical mounting arrangements, in the same way that BNC or "N" defines the connection interface and the mechanical mounting is separately specified.
I guess that those two particular configurations were so common that HAMs would have always seen SO-239 and PL-259 stamped on them and just started using those names for all UHF connectors.

The "N" in type N actually stands for Paul Neill, the engineer at Bell Labs who developed it, and BNC stands for Bayonetted Neill-Concelman, a joint work with Paul Neill and Carl Concelman, an engineer at the Amphenol Corporation back in the 1940s or '50s (sorry to all you navy guys who think BNC stands for Bayonetted Navy Connector :p).

By this same logic, you could probably make the argument that UHF connectors should be called "Q" connectors for E. Clarke Quackenbush, the guy at Amphenol who developed it back in the 1930s haha.

I don't think that this is exactly what the OP has. It is hard to tell, but it doesn't seem like a solder cup at the back. Not to mention the old-school bakelite dielectric. My guess is that it is a direct cable connection to some kind of coaxial cable. Again, estimating the scale is difficult, but it looks like it goes to RG-58 cable or something smaller like RG-174.
 

JonSea

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It's probably a mil-c-5015c circular connector, which is common in shipboard installations which this may be from the picture. These come with various numbers of pins, in configurations with different keying options. A mating connector will be expensive, typically with contacts, body and back shell being supplied separately.
images(3).jpg
 

spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It's probably a mil-c-5015c circular connector, which is common in shipboard installations which this may be from the picture. These come with various numbers of pins, in configurations with different keying options. A mating connector will be expensive, typically with contacts, body and back shell being supplied separately.
Shipboard installation- yes. I was thinking about a military installation.

Surprisingly, some of the Mil type connectors (general aviation) are available relatively cheap from ebay and Alibaba. But if you had to buy Amphenol parts from Mouser etc, they would be hellish expensive.

spec
 
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