• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

What is IoT connectivity solution?

Ian Rogers

User Extraordinaire
Forum Supporter
Most Helpful Member
You are asking a lot about IOT... It would also appear you have very little knowledge about IOT.. You should let us know WHY you are interested about it... To be honest, I never paid much attention to it... It'll be over soon.. It was supposed to be "The next big thing"... It wasn't...
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
...To be honest, I never paid much attention to it... It'll be over soon.. It was supposed to be "The next big thing"... It wasn't...
Hold on while I have Alexia turn on some of the lights that some 37 ESP8266-based modules in my house control, then I can ask he to find some statistics. Oh wait just a second. The washer just told me it is finished, so I need to switch the clothes to the dryer. Darn, that was the last of my laundry detergent so I'll just click this button to automatically order more from Amazon.....

You were saying? Oh, pardon me again. The hot pot just sent a message that it's done cooking and I see on my phone that the steak on the bbq is at the perfect temperature. You can explain to me later how IoT is a flop and won't last.
 

Ian Rogers

User Extraordinaire
Forum Supporter
Most Helpful Member
Perhaps its because I don't follow it.. If alexa and portal are classed as "IOT" I dont want it.... If the video I watched about a perv who hacked a 6 year old childs bedroom camera is something to go by, well no I will never follow it....

One thing I will say Jon... I know your views on my views... so to speak... Your sarcasm, as always, is duly noted..

To Anu_T …. Sorry I replied... Obviously Prompting a response from you, wasn't allowed...
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
ESP8266 wifi-enabled microcontrollers became known to the western world in 2014. They quickly became a favorite of hobbyists but more importantly, at the heart of many or even most commercial wifi-controlled switches, outlets, light bulbs and other devices, you'll find an ESP8266 (or perhaps its cousin the ESP32). What's not to love that for about 5 bucks you can create a wifi-enabled device using Arduino code?

There is a huge infrastructure developed around these devices for both homemade and commercial devices. The web service IFTTT (If This Then That) allows integration of commercial devices from different manufacturers and homebrew devices. For example, if my homebrew ESP8266 device detects that the temperature is over a certain point, by interfacing to IFTTT, my vent fan controlled by an iTead Sonoff module can be turned on. Thanks to services like IFTTT, you're not constrained to one manufacturer's system.


At home, I don't actually use Alexa. I use Goggle Home as a voice interface. There are about 37 ESP8266s on the network, mostly controlling lights but also able to open the garage doors, controlling soldering irons in my lab, monitoring temperatures around the house, etc. I have one ESP8266 that's setup as an IR remote for my Pioneer amp, after Pioneer abandoned their remote control app so it doesn't work with current versions of Android phones.

I don't have a wifi-enabled hot pot, bbq thermometer or washer, although such devices do exist. If you can add wifi capability for less than 5 bucks, it's not unreasonable to add wifi to a product costing 50 bucks.

A lot of this technology is for convenience. Yes, I rather enjoy making my way to bed as I ask Google to turn on and off lights as I go. It's handy in the kitchen or lab to ask Google to set a timer or ask it to do a conversion or other math. With my soldering irons, it's a convenience and a safety feature. I know with a single voice command that all the heat-producing devices are off, even if I forgot to turn them off using their switches.

How about some other safety features? At my grandmother's house, the front door lock is wifi enabled. Why is this a safety feature? Suppose she needs help but can't get to the door to unlock it? I can remotely unlock it so the fire department doesn't need to break down the door to gain access. In an emergency, precious time could be saved, as well as the expense of repairing the door. And Google is just a shout away to get help in the first place.

There's also a wifi-enabled Bissell Crosswave electric mop at grandmother's. Why does a mop need to be wifi enabled? If the time comes where we have to hire some additional help, there's a web app that allows you to track usage. Did the help really mop or just tell you that they did?


There are some 20-billion ESP8266 modules in use. Sure, it's handy to control the lights, but is it worth the expense? iTead's Sonoff modules start at 5 bucks each. More polished consumer switches can be had for less than 10 bucks. The ESP8266 has enabled this ubiquitous[/i] technology.

So IoT isn't a flop, and as long as Internet is around, I suspect it will be here to stay.
 

Visitor

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
This screen shot shows a list of IoT manufacturers supported by Google Home. I could only capture names starting with A - C, as my screen capture would scroll would capture.

I guess the screenshot is too large. Google Home supports hundreds of manufacturers.
 

unclejed613

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
At home, I don't actually use Alexa. I use Goggle Home as a voice interface.
bad idea to put a permanently hot mic on an internet connection in your home.... i would prefer having my own internal system, and only have it interact with the outside world when i want it to... before anybody goes "all in" on IoT look up "defcon iot hacking" on youtube and educate yourself.... many of these devices have little or no security features built in.
 

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top