• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

voltage for electronic systems

Status
Not open for further replies.

neo_star

New Member
What is the minimum voltage that is needed for an electronic device to work?
 

KMoffett

Well-Known Member
Active or passive?

Ken
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Silicon diodes have a minimum forward drop of about 0.6V so that's a practical minimum for Si devices. Germanium diodes have a minimum drop of about 0.4V so that's about the minimum for Ge devices.

I have a Sony AM-FM pocket radio which operates from one AA battery and will work down do near 1V while driving earphones, which I consider somewhat amazing for an analog IC. That's probably a reasonable minimum for a practical circuit today (but most require more than that).
 
Last edited:

nike6

Banned
there is 0.2 volts digital logic, i think from Intersil but not exactly sure.

the Si and Ge barrier voltages are just the two classical cases.

also at low current silicon diodes do no drop 0.7 volts, not even 0.6 volts.
 

colin55

Well-Known Member
Some devices work to 0.7v to 0.9v (supply voltage) as they have a capacitor voltage multiplier circuit to increase the voltage to 2v and up to 5v.
 

nike6

Banned
I'd say 2.4 volts (the voltage produced by 2 NiMH batteries) is the reasonable lower margin for today's standard microcontrollers, and digital circuits.

sure there is some new low voltage FPGA but it is not easily available, and you can not just solder a small IC, connect 2 batteries, and it will do something. so it counts differently.

also LEDs need at least 1.5 volts to 2.5 volts.

I've encountered single cell AA supplies inside minidisc player, and scent dispenser.
they contain dc/dc converters.

2.4 volts devices can work directly from the NiMH batteries, as they will retain that voltage over most of the discharge curve.
so it is a very economic threshold.
 

Hero999

Banned
What makes you say that?

It's possible to build a motor or lamp that runs on less than 0.2V.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Depends upon the definition of "Electronic systems".
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
This question is kind of meaningless...kind of like what is the minimum amount of food animals has to eat to live. The anwer is...it depends!
 
Last edited:

Hero999

Banned
Agreed, it's a silly question.

Anyway as far as I'm concerned there's little point in bothering to design anything that will work below 800mV of so because it will work fine from a single AA cell.
 

BrownOut

Banned
WELL DUH!

(more words to satisfy the minimum word requirement... talking about silly!)
 

rmn_tech

Member
0.007895274620054186034v

Just a meaningless number for a meaningless question.

0.2v ? why not -0.2v

Lets be honest if you think about it -1000v is less than 0.2v
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top