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Voltage doubler

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chopper

New Member
i would like to power up a system which need 3.7V dc and 350mA.

Now, i have an input of 2V,can i use a voltage doubler to power up the system??

If cant,any solution to this problem?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Is the 2V input DC? You'll need a DC to DC boost converter, your power requirements aren't that steep there are plenty of IC's out there that can do it. Linear makes some IC's that should fit your needs. If your input is AC (though I don't see how it can be) you can use a step up transformer and then a bridge rectifier, but at those voltages it's going tobe very inefficient. A good DC-DC boost converter will be 80% or better efficient.
 

bountyhunter

Well-Known Member
A good DC-DC boost converter will be 80% or better efficient.
I would hazard a guess that there are no IC boost regs that can hold 80% efficiency boosting 2v (0.6A) up to 3.7V @ 350 mA. The peak currents on the 2V supply would go through the switches. Like I said, it's theoretically possible but I think the efficiency would be pretty bad. 60% would actually be pretty good for this. I believe Maxim has the biggest selection of low voltage boost ICs.
 
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Papabravo

Well-Known Member
i forgot to mention,the input is 2V ac
So a bridge rectifier will get you 2.8 Volts DC and you will still need a low voltage DC-DC converter with all the same problems mentioned by bountyhunter. Where is the cockamamie requiremnt coming from?

So how about a 1:1.5 stepup transformer that gets you to 3VAC, a bridge rectifier gets you 4.24VDC and a 3-terminal LDO that brings it back to 3.7VDC -- simple and straightforward - eh?
 
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Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Two half wave rectifiers on opposite half cycles will get him 5V with schottky diodes.

Mike.
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The one I'm thinking of gives ±2.5V either side of one of the AC lines. See attached.

Mike.
 

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