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VGA to RCA signal converter gives different colored lines

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Technoid0

New Member
I bought one of those cheap VGA to RCA converters for my TV (like this: https://www.amazon.com/Lenkeng-1047...LBW&linkCode=xm2&psc=1&tag=duckduckgo-ffsb-20). It worked well for about a year of very frequent usage, then all of a sudden it started showing a bunch of white, red, yellow, green, blue, etc. vertical lines on the TV. I bought another one, it works fine. I'm just curious what could have happened. The capacitors look okay, the whole circuit doesn't have anything visibly wrong with it. Tried different cables and it did the same thing. My only guess is a heating problem, since the case hardly has any ventilation. I would like to know what happened so I can hopefully prevent it from happening to my current one.

Thanks!
 

Externet

Active Member
I would attempt resoldering suspicious and fail prone joints all over its board. And it is not RCA video. It is composite video.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
The description on the website mentions that thie device can be configured for either PAL or NTSC via switches....perhaps one of those switches is becoming intermittent?
 

Technoid0

New Member
When it's switched to PAL it shows the desktop picture, but in black and white and it flickers up and down really fast. It's never done this. Also, it doesn't have any physical switches for it, despite saying so. Some pictures even show them, but they're not there. The holes in the board for it are empty. It sounds like it's that way with all of them. Don't know what's up with that.
 

schmitt trigger

Well-Known Member
Do you have access to a scope?

Simultaneously connect the scope and TV.
Put your scope in TV trigger, field-rate mode. Display a couple of fields.

Watch to see if whenever the TV image jumps, so does the waveform on the scope.
 
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