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Using Solid State Relay to Light up a Bulb

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raziiq

New Member
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Hi there.

I have got this Solid State Relay , and i wanna make a circuit so that i can use this relay to take an input of 5V and give me an output of 110V (enough to lightup a bulb of almost 60WATT).

What else do i need to make this circuit?

BTW i have heard that breadboards are not a good choice to deal with high voltage, what should be the choice then?
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
Put the 5 volts across the input and then connect the line power across the output and switch it just as you would with a mechanical relay. Its that simple.
 

raziiq

New Member
thanks for the reply but i m very new to electronics and have never played with Relays before. Can you plz guide me in a little more depth on how to do this?
 

ke5frf

New Member
thanks for the reply but i m very new to electronics and have never played with Relays before. Can you plz guide me in a little more depth on how to do this?

Easy as 1,2,3
Follow the diagram below.
 

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raziiq

New Member
Thanks for the reply. This diagram is of great help, thank you.

One thing i wanna know about this is , you have connected one end of Relay to the Mains, right? But i am gonna use a cord, as shown in the figure below, which end of the cord should i connect to Relay?

9206-die-electricshelf.jpg


Because if i see inside this cord i ll get two wires. which one should go to Relay?
 

Sceadwian

Banned
raz it's listed right in the schematic...
 

RCinFLA

Well-Known Member
The thinner of the two blades of the plug is the hot. Wider slot is neutral.

The cord picture is a joke, right?
 

raziiq

New Member
Didnt get what he was saying, thats why i asked. Playing with AC high voltage is not a joke, so wanted to be sure before jumping into it.

Thanks for the reply though.
 

ke5frf

New Member
BTW this is my understanding of this circuit. Anything else to add in here?

9208-arduinossr.jpg

This is just a cuter version of exactly what I drew (with the exception of 13 VDC vs 5VDC as the signal voltage and I included a switch)

Between these two diagrams, what isn't clear?

One note that isn't trivial. Ensure that the switching (relay) is done on the hot (line) side of the bulb. It is poor engineering practice to switch the neutral side in circuits such as this. This is because when the circuit is de-energized (DC signal switched OFF), if the switch is on the neutral side, line voltage will still be present through the bulb and wiring presenting a dangerous situation if a ground path is presented.
 

ke5frf

New Member
Huh? Looking at the drawing, 13 volts for the DC supply (odd voltage BTW), but the SSR is labeled 4-7 volts input. Who drew this picture? That is misleading.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
ke5, it's not 13 volts for the DC supply, I think it's pin 13
 

raziiq

New Member
This is just a cuter version of exactly what I drew (with the exception of 13 VDC vs 5VDC as the signal voltage and I included a switch)

Between these two diagrams, what isn't clear?

No i am not saying it was not clear, that was really clear, but i was just making sure i m not understanding it in a wrong way.

One note that isn't trivial. Ensure that the switching (relay) is done on the hot (line) side of the bulb. It is poor engineering practice to switch the neutral side in circuits such as this. This is because when the circuit is de-energized (DC signal switched OFF), if the switch is on the neutral side, line voltage will still be present through the bulb and wiring presenting a dangerous situation if a ground path is presented

By this you mean i should connect the +ve of Bulb to Terminal 1 or 2 and the -ve of the Bulb to the -ve of the AC cord? Right?
 

Mr RB

Well-Known Member
You need a fuse on the wire from the mains outlet to the relay.

That picture of the zig-zag cord is most likely a complete product, a convection heater element of some type. A rather unsafe looking one too.
 

ke5frf

New Member
Perhaps this drawing, including a plug and socket diagram, will help you more safely wire up the relay and learn as you go.

Typically, remember, that the power cord has three wires. Line (hot) is usually black but sometimes red, orange or blue. Neutral is usually white but I have seen grey and on rare occasion brown. Ground is usually green, green/yellow, or uninsulated wire
**IF IN DOUBT DO AN OHM METER CONTINUITY CHECK BETWEEN THE SPADES AND THE ENDS OF THE WIRES TO VERIFY!!**

I advice you to build your project in an enclosure, making sure all AC wiring and connections are insulated from human touch when energized. If the enclosure is metal, THIS IS WHEN YOU SHOULD USE THE GROUND WIRE. Connect the ground wire to the metal enclosure with a screw and eye-crimp connection. This is for safety to provide a path to ground in case electric power shorts to the metal.
 

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raziiq

New Member
Perhaps this drawing, including a plug and socket diagram, will help you more safely wire up the relay and learn as you go.

Typically, remember, that the power cord has three wires. Line (hot) is usually black but sometimes red, orange or blue. Neutral is usually white but I have seen grey and on rare occasion brown. Ground is usually green, green/yellow, or uninsulated wire
**IF IN DOUBT DO AN OHM METER CONTINUITY CHECK BETWEEN THE SPADES AND THE ENDS OF THE WIRES TO VERIFY!!**

I advice you to build your project in an enclosure, making sure all AC wiring and connections are insulated from human touch when energized. If the enclosure is metal, THIS IS WHEN YOU SHOULD USE THE GROUND WIRE. Connect the ground wire to the metal enclosure with a screw and eye-crimp connection. This is for safety to provide a path to ground in case electric power shorts to the metal.

This diagram clears all my doubts. BTW that switch at the DC part is to turn it on/Off right? But as i m going to use the Microcontroller, in my case the Arduino which is being controlled through a software and will act as a switch, so i think i dont need that Switch.

Thanks for the Diagram. :), you are of great help.
 

ke5frf

New Member
Yes, a fuse between line and the SSR would definitely be advisable. If you are unsure how to rate the fuse, consider the bulb power rating. For instance, 60 watts.

I=P/E (current =power/voltage)
I=60/120
I=.5 amps

Rate the fuse slightly higher than the amperage rating.

Use sufficient gauge wiring in your circuit to handle 60 watts at .5 amps. If your wire insulation feels warm to the touch when energized, it is probably too small. 14 gauge wire should handle your demands here.
 

raziiq

New Member
You need a fuse on the wire from the mains outlet to the relay.

That picture of the zig-zag cord is most likely a complete product, a convection heater element of some type. A rather unsafe looking one too.

Now whats this?? :confused: Do i need to add something to ke5frf's latest diagram?
 
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