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Using Schottky Rectifiers

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Scubasteve

New Member
Hey all,

I have been wandering about using some schottky in a bridge rectifier because of their much lower forward drop (350mV typical) voltage. Is there any problems with using these diodes in this application?

Also, I have designed a voltage quadrupler with ~1000uF capacitors (these were found to be optimal) with silicon diodes, can I expect this to work okay with schottky diodes also? I am just leary that I am missing a spec or something that would render these useless, but I am probably wrong.

I guess people don't use these often for such things because of their expense over regular silicon diodes..

Anyone have any insight?

Steve
 

Chippie

Member
Using Schottky's in a bridge is an expensive way of doing it.......but as you say lower forward v drop, but is it really necessary to go this far ?

Schottky's may be faster but this attribute isnt really needed if you are just rectifying std 50/60 hz.......


I also believe using them in such a way gives rise to extraneous radiation(RF spikes) caused by their fast switching action........something I read along the way, a while back, so they need extra caps across them to alleviate this to some degree.....


My opinion, stick with the Silicon counter part, cheaper :)


As for the multiplier, yeah should work, again costly.
 

Scubasteve

New Member
Hi Chippie,

Thanks for your reply, it is good to know that these will work for my application. I need the low forward voltage dtop, I am actually getting a good regulated 5Vdc from a 6.3Vac output on a transformer.. (0.35mV drop X 2 + 300mV LDO Regulator at 3A)

I know that the transformer is at its RMS value, but I want to be safe.. The manufacturer actually didn't specify voltage under no-load and load, should I assume that it can put out 6.3VacRMS under its full rated 1.6A load?

Thanks again!!,

Steve
 

Chippie

Member
"should I assume that it can put out 6.3VacRMS under its full rated 1.6A load? "

If that is what the manufacturer claims then it should deliver the full rated output
 
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