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US $1.5 steam inhaler, safe for health?

Willen

Well-Known Member
This types of cheap steam inhaler has just two steal rods dipped into the fresh water. After applying mains to the rods, water starts to boil primarily just around these these mains rods. So I think it is not pure hot water steam. Do I have to say it's a smoky steam of 220v shorted through water?
So the main curiosity is if a patient suffering from lung infection, is it safe to inhale?
 

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Papabravo

Well-Known Member
I'm not an expert on medical issues, but impurities are the reason for any conduction that takes place. Distilled water is an insulator. That said any solid particles are unlikely to be transported by the steam, but any volatile organic compounds in the water will be present in the steam.

I have to ask why anyone would consider treating a serious medical condition with a cheap piece of crap. It's not something I would consider.
 

Wp100

Well-Known Member
That unit looks very dodgy, for little more money you can get better ones where the water is isolated from the heater.
You can buy nebulizers quiet cheaply which would be even better, provided the Doctor advised its use ?

If a real lung infection vs just a common cold then think the patient needs proper treatment.

001675.jpg
 

JimB

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
is it safe to inhale?
I say:

Not safe electrically, the shock hazard is high.

Not safe chemically, unless the water is pure, distilled or de-ionised, who knows what is in there.
The steel rods my decompose due to electrolytic action.
There will be hydrogen and oxygen gasses produced by electrolysis. This will also create a fire hazard.

What a piece of nasty!

JimB
 

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As others have pointed out, there are a lot of unknowns. One I would be worried about, particularly if my lungs weren't quite healthy, would be getting Legionella.

Generation of steam by conventional methods at high temperature probably kills it, but vaporizers ("cold steam") and something like you describe provide aerosols and fomites, which can transmit it. Remember, the first cases were related to steam cooling towers.

Here's a good review: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0360132317302597 I wouldn't mess with it.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do I have to say it's a smoky steam of 220v shorted through water?
Yep...

So the main curiosity is if a patient suffering from lung infection, is it safe to inhale?

No.
There is no way of knowing just what substances get added to the water in the process - and if the user accidentally tips it and makes contact with the liquid, they could be electrocuted.

As others say, avoid it at all costs.

(Jim's idea of distilled / deionised water would be great with a conventional heater, but no use with this type of gadget, as deionised water does not conduct).
 

audioguru

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Drinking water has chlorine in it to kill bacteria. Chlorine is "an irritant to the respiratory system".
Steam is hot which would damage your mouth, throat and lungs.

Covid-19 is virus that causes a lung infection that has its severity reduced by the Covid vaccine, not steam.
 

augustinetez

Active Member
Not safe chemically, unless the water is pure, distilled or de-ionised, who knows what is in there.
Still not safe, it's made of plastic of unknown grade and plastic is known to give off various compounds (some toxic) even with just water in it, let alone immersed elements boiling the water in it.

I wouldn't touch it with your 40ft barge pole (let alone mine :))
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have a large house humidifier that generates steam into my furnace plenum.
It has a plastic steamer module that has to replaced every year or two due to hard-water crud build-up and/or electrode degradation..
It generates steam by having two electrodes in that module that pass 220V through the water, so it would seem that this is a valid way to generate steam without health issues (ignoring the shock hazard of the subject device).
 

Pommie

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
It generates steam by having two electrodes in that module that pass 220V through the water, so it would seem that this is a valid way to generate steam without health issues (ignoring the shock hazard of the subject device).
Wouldn't you still get Electrolysis? I wouldn't like to have a mixture of Hydrogen/Oxygen anywhere near a furnace. And if using tap water, some countries add Chlorine/Fluorine to the water and I wouldn't want to be breathing any of those in.

Just curious.

Mike.
 

crutschow

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Wouldn't you still get Electrolysis?
Because of the alternating polarity, I think AC current does not cause significant electrolysis.
And I've never noticed any odor when it is operating.
 

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