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Transformer configuration in Proteus

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newfey

New Member
I have a center tapped transformer like this:


I want to get 12 V /220 V , 50Hz.
How should I change primary and secondary inductances ?
Many thanks for any hints ...
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Ls/Lp = (220/12)^2, where Lp is the inductance of half of the primary winding.
 

newfey

New Member
Ls/Lp = (220/12)^2, where Lp is the inductance of half of the primary winding.
Thank you.
Do you mean I can choose Lp myself? Anything I want? For example if I choose 1mH is it ok ?
 

newfey

New Member
As you said it will be 336 mH. What do you mean by Half of the primary winding?
Do you mean I have to choose it 2?
 

alec_t

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Do you mean I can choose Lp myself? Anything I want? For example if I choose 1mH is it ok ?
I have no idea what power/current your transformer is intended to handle, or what its drive waveform is. These parameters will dictate the optimum inductance in practice for a real-world transformer. For simulation, though, you can pick any value you like.
As drawn, the transformer has a centre-tapped primary and you seem to be energising only half of the primary at a time; hence the Lp value is for that half.
 
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spec

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
I have a center tapped transformer like this:


I want to get 12 V /220 V , 50Hz.
How should I change primary and secondary inductances ?
Many thanks for any hints ...
What are you trying to do with Proteus?

Not to sure why you are asking about inductance when you say you want 220V 50Hz output from the secondary of the transformer. Presumably this is related to your other post concerning an SCR driven transformer. http://www.electro-tech-online.com/threads/scr-triggering.148577/#post-1269857

If you alternately switch the two free ends of the primary windings to 0V (with a switching element) you will effectively have 12V peak across the two primaries. This translates to 12V * 0.707V = 8.484V RMS

The ratio of a transformer primary voltage to secondary voltage is N2/N1, where N1 is the number of turns of wire on the primary and N2 is the number of turns on the secondary.

Assume in the case of your transformer that each primary winding is 40 turns, giving a total of 80 turns for the primary then the number of turns on the secondary required to produce 220V RMS would be: (220V * 80 turns)/8.48V = 2075 turns.

The primary inductance of a transformer in this type of application defines the core magnetizing force (turns * Amps) which must be kept below the transformer core saturation. Note that the inductance of an inductor in proportional to the square of the number of turns, which leads to the paradox that the less the number of turns the greater the magnetizing force (for a voltage drive that is).

Here is a rough guide to the typical turns per volt (TPV) for 50Hz toroidal transformers:
(1) 1W: 100TPV
(2) 10W: 10TPV
(3) 100W: 4 TPV
(4) 1000W: (1KW) 1 TPV

spec
 
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TRU21

New Member
I am designing 24v 20amp smps. Can you please guide me about ferrite transformer calculation(turns and inductance) and suggest me another transformer type because it is not easily available ?
 
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