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Total and utter newbi

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russellwood

New Member
I know lots about house wiring but nothing about electronics, I have seen some small desktop binary clock, I would like to build a large binary wall clock, along the line of 3 feet by 2 feet. I am looking for the easiest way to do this.

I have seen a few projects around the net for binary clocks but i am not sure really where to start. Would want to clock to read hrs, mins and seconds, maybe say having a 10 leds for each number on the clock. The building of the frame is easy, but i have no idea on the electronic side. So a easy to follow guide of how it can be done would be great.

Many thanks in advance

Russell
 

ke5frf

New Member
I can only take your own words to offer advice. You say you know nothing about electronics but know about house wiring. Well, house wiring is really nothing more than breakers, switches, outlets, and lights with the occasional motor from a fan or compressor and heater elements.

All components are passive devices and run on the same 60 Hz power (in the US at least)

Knowing how to wire a building is a great foundation to build upon, but the binary clock circuit you are wanting to tackle is, honestly, a quantum leap to be making. Undoubtedly, you could obtain a schematic, parts list, and construction tips and build your clock, but you would be doing nothing more than painting by numbers.

What I suggest you do, if you are serious about learning, is go get a couple of books on basic AC/DC theory as well as Analog/Digital electronics. Read them twice, front to back, three times if anything confuses you. Take notes, focus on the things you don't understand, and research the internet for better explanations. Come here if the answer still eludes you.

By this point, you will at least be able to understand how everything works in your binary clock circuit. With a little experience, you might even be able to design your own. Don't go into this blind.
 

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
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