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Toner removal from copper board..

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smanches

New Member
Any suggestions on how to erase a board that you already have toner on? I screwed up my registration very badly between the top and bottom of the board, but can't really figure out a good way to clean it up.
 

smanches

New Member
Nice, I even have a can of Acetone at home. :)

I think...

Thank you!
 
Last edited:

jpanhalt

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
To put that cautionary note into perspective, the same goes for alcohol (ethyl alcohol). OSHA regulations have the same PEL for acetone and ethanol (1000 ppm TEW). Avoid the fumes, but don't overreact to the danger.

John
 

morseindustries

New Member
removal of toner

hi a soapy steel wool will remove the toner no need for chemicals just clean under water to remove soap resisdue

just out of interest i leave the toner on and solder the connections without a problem this also protects the copper unless you are lacquering the board.

cheers brad

morseindustries (pcb manufacturer & rf engineer)
 

smanches

New Member
Yea, well the fumes are nothing compared to the muriatic acid I'm using to etch. Always do all this kind of stuff outdoors anyway.

A little acetone on a paper towel took it off with no problem. Thanks again.
 

giftiger_wunsch

New Member
Acetone isn't a significantly dangerous chemical; like many organic solvents, it can have a range of effects such as dizziness and queasiness, but as long as it's used in a well-ventilated environment (and used in sensible volumes) the danger is marginal.

As for hydrochloric acid (I had to google what 'muriatic acid' was, I guess you're still using an old-fashioned name smanches), the dangers depend on concentration. In concentrations less than ~2mol/dm³ it is classified as an irritant and contact with the skin (and especially other parts of the body) should be avoided; it starts to become classified as corrosive as it becomes more concentrated; in relatively high concentrations, enough hydrogen chloride is airborne in the fumes that breathing apparatus become necessary to avoid the HCl dissolving in your mucous membranes, eyes, etc. and reforming hydrochloric acid (not a comfortable situation to be in :eek:)
 
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