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Thevenin, norton and superposition theorem circuit

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rds1975

New Member
Hi

I am trying to solve the same circuit by using thevenin's , norton and superposition theorem. Can any body help me in solving and understanding the circuit.

Thanks
 

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Optikon

New Member
rds1975 said:
Hi

I am trying to solve the same circuit by using thevenin's , norton and superposition theorem. Can any body help me in solving and understanding the circuit.

Thanks

what is the output you want to solve for? the voltage across one of the resistors? The equivalent impedance from a node to node?
 

ljcox

Well-Known Member
Thevenin Theorem and superposition theorem methods attached.

Thevenin
Cut the circuit at the red lines. Calculate the Thevenin voltages and resistances. The Thevenin voltage at a is the voltage that would be measured between a and 0
with a voltmeter, and the Thevenin resistance is the resistance that would be measured between a and 0 with an Ohmmeter with the voltage source replaced by a short circuit. The same applies to the right hand side. Now connect the 12 Ohm resistor between the two Thevenin resistors. Then calculate the current, and hence the voltages at a and b with respect to 0.

Superposition
Replace one voltage source with a short circuit, and calculate the voltages at a and b with respect to 0 and call them Va1 and Vb1. This can be done using Ohm's Laws, Kirchoff's Laws or Thevenin's Theorem. Now restore the voltage source and replace the other one with a short circuit. Calculate the voltages at a and b with respect to 0 and call them Va2 and Vb2. The voltages at a and b with respect to 0 are now the sum of these voltages. Va = Va1 + Va2, and Vb = Vb1 + Vb2.
 

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ljcox

Well-Known Member
Here is the solution using the Norten Theorem

Len
 

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rds1975

New Member
Hi Thanks to you all. Missing information

Thanks to you all friends for the response. Sorry that I did not give you one more information. In the above circuit, I wanted to find current in 8 ohms resistor and not 10 ohms. Sorry once again.
The answer should be some where around 0.24 A , but iam not getting the steps to do that. Could you please help me once again

Thanks
 

ljcox

Well-Known Member
Re: Hi Thanks to you all. Missing information

rds1975 said:
Thanks to you all friends for the response. Sorry that I did not give you one more information. In the above circuit, I wanted to find current in 8 ohms resistor and not 10 ohms. Sorry once again.
The answer should be some where around 0.24 A , but iam not getting the steps to do that. Could you please help me once again

Thanks

If you refer to my post, if you calculate the voltages at points a and b, then you can calculate all of the currents using Ohm's Law.

Len
 
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