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Tesla Coil Help please @DerStrom and others.

Discussion in 'High Voltage' started by SolarFusion, Apr 20, 2014.

  1. SolarFusion

    SolarFusion New Member

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    Hello, I am interested in building a small Tesla coil. I am however having a difficult time finding any easy to understand documentation online. I saw that you people know quite a bit about them here:http://www.electro-tech-online.com/...ni-120v-tesla-coil-science-demo-style.124963/ so I thought I would ask you. What I need to know is: what parts do I need to find, is it possible to run one on as low a voltage as 9vDC, if 9vDC doesn't work then 120vAC, and the order in which the parts are assembled.

    I have already found this calculator: http://www.classictesla.com/java/javatc/javatc.html and it seems like once I have my parts it will be a big help in figuring out my coil/topload objects.

    Thanks
    SolarFusion
     
  2. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Hello SolarFusuion, welcome to ETO!

    9vDC, coupled with a driver circuit and a high voltage transformer such as a Flyback transformer or an ignition coil and the right circuitry, you would probably be able to run a very small coil, perhaps 4-6 inches high. You would need a high current supply though, probably one around 6 amps, considering the low voltage. If this interests you let me know and I will see if I can bring up a circuit for you.

    A 120vac coil would be easier to build since you don't have to worry about a driver circuit. The choice of which route to take is completely up to you. Let me know what your decision is and we can move on from there.

    Regards,
    Matt
     
  3. SolarFusion

    SolarFusion New Member

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    Okay, the 120v sounds easier so what will I need?


    I have another question: Would it be possible to build a constant circuit in which a Tesla Turbine powers a magnetic generator which powers the Coil which powers an air compressor which powers the turbine?

    ^I know it sounds a bit far fetched but could it theoretically be done?

    TTYL
    Solar
     
  4. dave

    Dave New Member

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  5. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    What you suggest above is called "Perpetual Motion", aka "Over-Unity". This goes against the laws of physics--you will always lose energy due to friction, drag, heat, etc, so you will not be able to keep it going. So that part is downright impossible, sorry to say.

    The first thing I'd get for a small 120v Tesla coil is the high voltage transformer. What size are you hoping for? The height of your coil will help determine the size of transformer you'll need.

    I'll walk you through this step by step if you like, but the parts you'll need are a transformer, a capacitor bank, a spark gap, a primary coil, a secondary coil, and a topload. This is assuming you're going for a Spark Gap Tesla Coil (SGTC) rather than a solid-state. Solid-state Tesla Coils (SSTCs) are generally MUCH more complex and not recommended for beginners.

    I'll be asking for your input throughout the process. Tesla Coils can be quite finicky, so we will need to work this out the best we can together.

    Regards,
    Matt
     
  6. SolarFusion

    SolarFusion New Member

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    Okay, I'm gonna need to take some time to think it over about as you said; How big? where to put it? What output voltage I want? Etc. Etc. I will post here again once I figure that out.

    Thanks
    Solar
     
  7. gary350

    gary350 Well-Known Member

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    There was a circuit like that in Popular Electronic Magazine back in the late 1960s. The tapered secondary coil is not good, make a secondary that is straight. Tesla Coils have come a lot way in 65 years there are better circuits than that and easy circuits to build.

    Here is one I built 15+ years ago when I was very active on the Tesla Coil forum. I built it with a 6000v 20ma furnance ignition transformer, 1 home made poly capacitor, RQ gap with about 5 gap 1/32", flat wound primary coil 15t made with #12 copper wire, secondary is 1.5" pvc pipe 900 turns of #30 wire. This tiny TC makes 3" long sparks. The whole TC is small enough to set on your desk. There is a round door knob on top of the secondary.

    You can improve the performance of this coil by winding 3 secondary coils over the top of each other then connect all 3 coils in parallel. You can do this to any secondary output sparks will get longer. Be sure to paint each secondary with polyurethane varnish and let it dry, completely dry or bake it in the oven 250 degrees F.

    Pic of tiny TC bottom left corner of this photo.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2015
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Super Moderator Most Helpful Member

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    Hi Gary,

    Just checking, did you intend to respond to a year-old post? :D

    Matt

    EDIT: Just realized the post was moved.....
     
  9. gary350

    gary350 Well-Known Member

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    I should probably start looking at the Dates.
     

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