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Solder wire to PCB

Thread starter #1
Hello people!
I have 4 strands of SWG17( AWG15) wire coming from transformer which i need to solder to the pcb tracks. What will be the best way to solder because solder connection can become weak due to tension. I can't use any screws because inductance will come into picture. I am thinking of gluing it with a glue-gun. Do I have any better alternatives?
 

dknguyen

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#2
I hope you weren't thinking about gluing the wire without the solder since the glue isn't perfectly hard and can flex so the wires can move away from the pad and lose contact. Not to mention the glue can get in between the wire and the pad. You must use solder. But if you want stress relief then hot glue is still bad. Hot glue is terrible. Never use it for anything that is meant to be permanently or semi-permanently held there.

Best bet is a blob of epoxy or NON-CORROSIVE neutral cure silicone in addition to the solder. You can blob it directly over the solder joint (but good luck making any future changes or repairs) or nearby along the wire to adhere it to the board so the forces are taken up by the adhesive and not the solder joint.

Also, are you aware that nylon screws exist?
 
Last edited:

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#3
The OP's question is wierd. There may be times where his/her concerns are valid. Nylon would non-interfere. Components can also be held by electronic grade silicone. Locktite makes tak-pak to secure wires to a PCB. Solder works. Remove the tension.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#4
Hello people!
I have 4 strands of SWG17( AWG15) wire coming from transformer which i need to solder to the pcb tracks. What will be the best way to solder because solder connection can become weak due to tension. I can't use any screws because inductance will come into picture. I am thinking of gluing it with a glue-gun. Do I have any better alternatives?
Are you concerned that the wires move during operation and you want to avoid noise caused by the subsequent change of inductance? Or do you want to actually use glue to make the electrical connection?
 

MichaelaJoy

Active Member
#5
What kind of transformer is it?

Please post a pic of the PC board and the transformer. If you have a steel rule, please include it in the picture for reference.
Show the points on the PCB where you intend to connect the transformer. Show the wire next to the PCB lands, so that we have an
idea of the dimensions.

There are a number of ways to do something like that. You could use bare solid copper wire, make a right-angle bend and form a loop into
the wire. Then, solder that in place and use 5 minute epoxy to glue it down.

At that point, you have an eyelet that you can solder to. ;)

Make sure you clean off the solder mask in the area where you are working. Otherwise, the epoxy may not hold.
 

dougy83

Well-Known Member
#6
I can only assume the OP is talking about strain relief, in which case gluing the wires to the board is effective. The wires are, of course, still soldered to the PCB. A silicon glue will probably stick better than some hot glues.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
#7
A silicon glue will probably stick better than some hot glues.
I think you would be more correct in saying,
"SOME silicone glues will stick better than some hot glues."

Unfortunately, MOST silicone glues emit acetic acid as it cures which causes corrosion on metallic parts of the board.

Also NOTE:
Silicon is a brittle element and nobody has found a way to make a glue out of it but seems too work quite well as a semiconductor when doped with other elements. I think you meant silicone (which is atom of silicon is modified with organic molecular fragments).
 

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