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Side cutting plier with return spring

Grossel

Well-Known Member
Hi folks.

Have a cheap side cutting plier (just calling it scp for short hereafter), and since I'm in the process of salvaging parts from an old car, there is a lot of wires to cut.

So I figured I need a better one, and bought a plier from bacho (this one) that have a so called return spring in the shaft. Since it's just a few hour since and it was quite epensive and my wallet still cries of agony :eek: :p

I haven't being able to find any usable information on this online, but I guess it is meant to dampen the sudden movement when the wire snap in half. I haven't used it on any hard material yet to test I must admit.

What is your thoughts on this patented spring, do you think it deserves the price range (about 6x more expensive than the cheap scp) ?

Anyone having any first hand experience about this feature of a scp? Something nice to have in hand or just unnecessary expensive ? (should probably asked before buying)
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
If you were rippping out cables, I'd suggest something like: https://www.amazon.com/Journeyman-Leverage-Klein-Tools-J63050/dp/B00093GCK0

With thes you can cut a piece of SO cable easily.

For cutting leads off components, this https://www.amazon.com/Xuron-Purpose-Flush-Cutter-Blue/dp/B002N1OXKC is the way t o go
They can be had a springs. Best to cut small wires from resistors, not 18 AWG. I have broken the ends.
They cut and the leads don't fly. Anything hard breaks the jaw.

That first air of plyiers will be much better than what you suggested. I have a smaller pair for cutting coax cable., but I bought similar to the first one to cut 14AWG copper wire into bits to make material for a copper evaporation source.

They both work for soft copper.

It does take something different to cut piano wire.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
Hi folks.

Have a cheap side cutting plier (just calling it scp for short hereafter), and since I'm in the process of salvaging parts from an old car, there is a lot of wires to cut.

So I figured I need a better one, and bought a plier from bacho (this one) that have a so called return spring in the shaft. Since it's just a few hour since and it was quite epensive and my wallet still cries of agony :eek: :p

I haven't being able to find any usable information on this online, but I guess it is meant to dampen the sudden movement when the wire snap in half. I haven't used it on any hard material yet to test I must admit.
Presumably it simply springs the cutters open, as most cutter also have - the 'clever part' is that it's switchable, personally I don't like spring loaded cutters, and usually remove the spring.

They are only low cost cutters anyway - Lindstrom are the ones that used to make your wallet cry - but they lasted for decades.

They used to hand out Lindstrom 625D's at college (the same cutters as I owned, and still do) in practical lessons, but before they did they locked the doors - and wouldn't reopen the doors until all had been counted back in :D

After 30+ years use my 625D's will still cut a hair right at the tip - but they cost a few weeks wages, if not months?.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
As Nigel says, it's just to open the handles out again, ready for the next cut.

It's pretty much standard on smaller electronics type sidecutters, but not so common on large ones. I've not seen a "switchable" one before though.

Those are not expensive, at least by UK standards - about the same as we pay for small electronics cutters we expect to wear out routinely.

(And I also agree with Nigel about Lindstrom - we have a couple of tiny pairs around 30 years old, 7191 type - still like new despite a lot of use, but they cost crazy amounts back then & still not cheap now).
 

Grossel

Well-Known Member
If you were rippping out cables, I'd suggest something like: https://www.amazon.com/Journeyman-Leverage-Klein-Tools-J63050/dp/B00093GCK0
Thanks for suggestion, but that one is too rough, I need to cut a single wire at a time usually. I do have bigger tools more appropriate for cutting multiple wires if I need to do just that.

As Nigel says, it's just to open the handles out again, ready for the next cut.

It's pretty much standard on smaller electronics type sidecutters, but not so common on large ones. I've not seen a "switchable" one before though.
Yes, I figured you right. I somehow get the idea that the spring had another function as well, but of course that doesn't make much sense.

Those are not expensive, at least by UK standards - about the same as we pay for small electronics cutters we expect to wear out routinely.
Ok, I was in the impression that this scp I just bought was expensive, but if that is regarded non-expensive by professional, what features does a really expensive scp possess?
 
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rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
what features does a really expensive scp possess?
Price - and hopefully, life and precision...
eg.


These are the commonest ones we use for general work; they are pretty good for fine work until they wear, then they are ok for larger wires & cables for some time.
 

augustinetez

Active Member
These are the commonest ones we use for general work; they are pretty good for fine work until they wear, then they are ok for larger wires & cables for some time.
They can be resharpened - a quick run up on a grinder along the flat side brings them back to as new cutting wise.

Obviously gently, gently on the grinder and don't get them hot.
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
They can be resharpened - a quick run up on a grinder along the flat side brings them back to as new cutting wise.

Obviously gently, gently on the grinder and don't get them hot.
Once "sharpened" don't expect to cut any 30-gauge wires with any reliability and you may have trouble completely cleaving 22 or 24 gauge wire - depending on how steady your hand is and flat your grinder is. You might have more luck on a stone.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Once "sharpened" don't expect to cut any 30-gauge wires with any reliability and you may have trouble completely cleaving 22 or 24 gauge wire - depending on how steady your hand is and flat your grinder is. You might have more luck on a stone.
Why? I have sharpened them and they still cut just as good as new. You don't grind the bevels you grind the flat, outside edge like augustineteze said. Hold the handles tightly together and hold the flat side against the wheel, or like I do my belt sander. The bevels are on the inside of the cutting edge like in the video posted by BUK. Now if your talking the wire cutter's on the jaws of the pliers in post #8 that's a whole different ball game, and they aren't even made for small gauge wire.

.
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The bevels are on the inside of the cutting edge like in the video posted by BUK. Now if your talking the wire cutter's on the jaws of the pliers in post #8 that's a whole different ball game, and they aren't even made for small gauge wire.
I think you got the two mixed up?

Mine in post 8 are a small electronics type flush cut.

The pair in Buk's "how not to" video are large double bevel ones; you can see them clearly a few seconds in:

CuttersBevel.jpg
 

gophert

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Why? I have sharpened them and they still cut just as good as new. You don't grind the bevels you grind the flat, outside edge like augustineteze said. Hold the handles tightly together and hold the flat side against the wheel, or like I do my belt sander. The bevels are on the inside of the cutting edge like in the video posted by BUK. Now if your talking the wire cutter's on the jaws of the pliers in post #8 that's a whole different ball game, and they aren't even made for small gauge wire.

.
No, I'm talking about the fine side-cutters, especially the Xcellite-style shears for fine wires (more like a scissors than a pinching action).
8FAC755D-6330-48D5-9E59-AA5AEA2FC587.jpeg
 

rjenkinsgb

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
No, I'm talking about the fine side-cutters, especially the Xcellite-style shears for fine wires (more like a scissors than a pinching action).
8FAC755D-6330-48D5-9E59-AA5AEA2FC587.jpeg
Remember those are examples that are worn out, bent, sloppy and generally ready for the bin, just saved to avoid abusing newer ones!

Brand new out the packing, they do come with a perfect flat-ground finish and very precise edge-to-edge cut, no overlap:

Cutters_New.jpg
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
No, I'm talking about the fine side-cutters, especially the Xcellite-style shears
Didn't realize what those were showing in post #8. When I saw notches in the jaws I thought they were pliers, that have a bypass cutter near the joint. Like a pair of slip joint pliers.

That said I have sharpened many many sets of shears too. And they cut like new afterward.
 

shortbus=

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Brand new out the packing, they do come with a perfect flat-ground finish and very precise edge-to-edge cut, no overlap:
OK seeing them like that, my earlier post on sharpening stands. But the hing that makes sharpening cutters like that work is to keep pressure on the handles, to keep a grinding burr from forming. Doing it like that also keeps the very edge from over heating and getting soft while grinding.

When I was still working I was a die/tool maker and responsible for keeping things in good condition.
 

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