• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

SG Power Supply Board (Ingersoll-Rand)

Status
Not open for further replies.
I junk-picked this beautiful board last night and am wondering if anyone out there has any information concerning it. The only thing I could find on the net was from companies advertising their price to it's fixing. ($400+!).

I was hoping to get a schematic for it and put it to some use. Of course I'm not sure if it even works as there is some discoloration around the AC side of the board. I'd hate to dissect it.

Your comments would be much appreciated!

Tony
 

Attachments

duffy

Well-Known Member
I don't know what's "beautiful" about it. Looks like a series-pass regulator with a small 12V switching regulator subsection, and none of it appears to be isolated from the line!

No fuses, no parallel-mode filter, no isolation - not worth the trouble, sorry.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
I would disect it, there are some relativly healthy diodes inductors and caps on that board. I think all the black things are MOV's? If so why are there so many of them? I could be wrong I'm not that great at component identification. It might be useable as is if you can get a pin out for all of those header connections.
 
"Beauty," truly, is in the eye of the beholder, and my ignorance was bliss. The board will most likely end up in my parts scavage box but I was curious as to the boards application and dissappointed in not finding any information on the pin outs for the connections. Whatever it was used for, it is the heaviest board I've seen to date.

Thanks for the comments! Tony
 

tcmtech

Banned
Most Helpful Member
I say disect it. the actual value or the parts on it I doubt would run over $30 new!

I have several old power boards from plasma cutters and welders that have a $1000 to $2000 replacement value on them but they still have less than $100 in actual parts in them. Circuit boards have a crazy high mark up on them! Learn to fix them Its easy money! You could easily get $500 for replacing a few dollars worth of components if you have the right market!

Thats where that $400 price tag comes from!
 
I guess I'm in the wrong business! I was kinda shocked when I seen the cost of repairing it. Well I guess this board is going in my disect box. Right now I've got my brothers microwave on my bench to test the magnetron (for FREE). Me thinks me should start charging! (but it's sooo much fun)

Your thoughts on my post are appreciated!
 

Sceadwian

Banned
oooo, microwaves ovens can fun =) You can do all sorts of things you're not suppoesd to with them =) You can melt metal in them if you have a non-conductive crucible that can handle the heat, and you can melt glass in them too, you just have to heat a portion of the glass up with a blow torch to the point where it's just about to start to glow which causes it to ionize. Ionized glass will heat up in a microwave and melt. I've seen some youtube clips of it.

Be careful with microwaves though, they use extremely dangerous voltages inside.
 
I wouldn't have guessed you could do the metal whether in a non-conductive container or not! That gives me some ideas! I checked out the mag and it's all good. Now I'm trying to test the diodes but ran into a problem; my multi-meters don't put out enough power (at lest 6v) to check the resistance on them. Bummer! There's more then one way to skin a cat :)
 

Sceadwian

Banned
Teamleader.. Think of it this way. Microwaves consume 1000-1500 or so watts of power. They put out most of that as energy in the microwave range. Mind you puting anything besides food in a microwave can cause damage to the microwave itself, metal especially can cause feedback in the magnetron and bad things will happen. Mad scientist stuff is fun, but you have to be very conscious of saftey. To do otherwise can easily kill you or someone else and cause property damage.

All that being said CD's are particularly interesting to watch in a microwave. Also if you put a lit match in a microwave the extra energy from the microwave will actually create plasma balls that float around in side the oven. Yes, I said it, home made plasma. This is VERY dangerous to the microwave though. Search around on google and youtube, you'd be surprised what you can do with a microwave.

For basic saftey tips I would say, make sure you have a fire extinguisher nearby (CO2 ones work well) Make sure there is several feet of space around the microwave and aside from that this is best done outside or in a large basement where there is nothing flamable nearby and PLENTY of room/air. Make sure the microwave is fused right at the outlet (don't rely on the house breaker) And unless you know exactly what you're doing NEVER modify the microwave for ANY reason. You bypass the shielding on a microwave and you could black out WI-FI signals within a few miles... Let alone cause tissue damage or fire risks nearby.
 
Last edited:
Thanks for all the ideas! YouTube is a great place to learn also. I fixed my brothers micro, needed a magatron replaced; works great now! (and no explosions!)
 

duffy

Well-Known Member
I melted glass in a microwave, too! Did it by accident, has a champagne glass in there for some reason, and the damn stem melted. Nobody believed me.
 
There must have been something left in it. I pick up microwaves all the time (have two sitting in the shop for disection) and now I want to do some experiments!!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top