• Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

schematics

Status
Not open for further replies.

windozeuser

Member
I can read most schematics, I've been having trouble with schematics that have multiable pages and schematics that show completely seperate circuits off to the side of the main schematic. I've wanted to build my own 8051 Microcontroller programmer, but I don't quite understand the popular schematic floating around the internet. Is there a book or site that has schematics to practice on. Like a tutorial and walk through analysis.

Little confused Kid's problem http://chaokhun.kmitl.ac.th/~kswichit/pgm89_web/Pgm89.html
 

jrz126

Active Member
I spent about a month trying to get that programmer to work...
I'd suggest using a PIC microcontroller. They are more widely used, and easier to program. (take a look at Nigel's programmer compaired to that beast.) Or atleast look into the Atmel ISP programmer, it only requires one IC and a 5V supply.
With that being said...heres some hints on how to read that schematic...
capacitors 1,2,3, and 8 are bypass capacitors which are connected to the positve voltage and ground supply near an IC. If you download the actual board layout file, you'll see that they are placed very close to the IC's.
For wires labeled VDP, VCC, VUR, those are just the wire names and you'll want to connect them all together (that is, all of the VDP's together and the VCC's together ect.)

hope that helps.
 

Joel Rainville

New Member
Just my 2 cents, but this thing appears to rely on a lot of onboard ICs in order to accomodate the simple software.

PIC programmers are a lot simpler because much of the programming logic is handled by the programming software, not the programmer circuitry. And that's basically why we can choose between several software programs that are compatible with our particular programmer. I know of at least 4 different programs that work flawlessly with my Tait/7407 programmer.

It looks like what you are planning to build will only work with one author's software. Am i right?

Surely, there must be simpler, more flexible designs available out there?
 

Joel Rainville

New Member

windozeuser

Member
Wow, Thank you both for your posts. I'll order a PIC and some supplys and get started right away :D

btw.. Nigel Your site kicks ass :p
 

jrz126

Active Member
Oh yeah...you can order free samples of PICs from their website. http://sample.microchip.com/ Be sure to order the PDIP package or else you'll get one of those surface mount chips.
 

Nigel Goodwin

Super Moderator
Most Helpful Member
windozeuser said:
THanks, Which one should I order, for a beginner to experiment with
A good one to start with is the 18 pin 16F628, which is why my tutorials are based round it. For a larger PIC, try the 28 pin 16F876 or 40 pin 16F877.

Other 18 pin PIC's, with more facilities, are the 16F819 and 16F88, but the 16F628 keeps things simpler for you.
 

pearlyred

New Member
Cool. didnt know they offered that service. Have just ordered a few pics, hope they can deliver to NZ ok :p

LS
 

nandhu015

New Member
Hi
Now ISP programming is possible with atmel chips (at89c52) which needs only a chip (buffer) from lpt..

for a newbee this is a best choice
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top