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Repairing a basic cat toy

rsoko

New Member
I need to re-solder on contacts that were pulled out of the battery box. There is a simple switch (Picture attached- I re-soldered where I thought they would go in the picture) with two AA batteries powering a speaker and led box located in a Halloween Cat that vibrate and light up with a motion sensor.
Cat ReSolder for Patty.jpg Cat ReSolder for Patty 2.jpg

I am not sure where to re-solder back on the leads. I tried to wire up the positive lead to middle connection to the switch and the battery V+ to the left connection on the switch. Then I wired the gnd lead directly to the battery gnd. (I am guessing which lead from the Halloween Cat was + and -, not sure how to check polarity) I tried hooking up the cat, but it would not work. Any ideas???
 
Last edited:

Inquisitive

Super Moderator
Got a meter? Put batteries back in the holder and test which pins allow the switch to complete the circuit. Then solder accordingly.
 

rsoko

New Member
Got a meter? Put batteries back in the holder and test which pins allow the switch to complete the circuit. Then solder accordingly.
I put back in the batteries and tested the switch pins with my voltmeter. Both the middle and right pins show no voltage when the switch is in the on position, when the switch is turned off there is voltage shown on both the middle and the right pins... (switch on and off determined by marking on the casing) I am not sure why both show a voltage. I thought there would only be one that shows voltage....
I am a little confused that the speaker, motion sensor and speaker (Hidden inside the cat toy) are not functioning with the voltage connected. Does the polarity matter to which I am connecting in this simple circuit... might I have guessed wrong and blown something?
 

Inquisitive

Super Moderator
Hooking it up backwards is a possibility. DC is polarity specific.
 

cowboybob

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
Welcome to ETO, rsoko!

Please give us a photo of the printed circuit board (PCB) top and bottom, including the the battery wire connection points. There may be components that are polarized (and other items) that will indicate the proper polarity.

Take care with the focus so that the "traces" (flat, copper colored paths between components) are visible.

Without appropriate reverse polarity protection circuitry on the toy's PCB you, indeed, may have blown the circuit(s). You don't ordinarily see such protection in simple toys as you describe.

But, don't give up just yet.
 

rsoko

New Member
Thanks for the help! I am only able to get to the battery tray... the module for sound, motion detection and vibration are sewn into a Halloween Cat and since it is not mine (doing this as a favor to a nice little older lady that has sentimental value) I didn't want to take it apart to access the circuit board.
I looked a little closer and it seems that the positive battery connection was connected in the same place that I connected it (left switch connection) then the gnd from the battery was connected to the right pin on the switch and not sure where anything else was. It does not make logical sense to have both the gnd and v+ connected to the switch since it would short when the toy was switched on...
 

KeepItSimpleStupid

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
There could be a short that I can't see, but the "other end" puts the batteries in series.

By "convention" positive is switched, but it doesn't matter.

This you need a lead to a free battery terminal - (likey negative)

If you temporarily attach the other wire to the positive terminal, the toy should work without the switch. If it doesn't with fresh batteries, there is no point in going further. You also can't EXPECT reverse polarity protection.

A slide switch has 3 terminals e.g. (1) (2) (3)
(2) is the common terminal
1, is connected to 2 when the switch is pushed toward 1
3, is connected to 2 when the switch is pushed toward 3

Thus, the middle terminal and one outer one will get the job done. if there is an ON/OFF marking, then that could be reversed..
 

cowboybob

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
From your photo, your wiring:
Toy Switch.JPG
which is correct, EXCEPT we are not sure of your wiring polarity choice.

Does your voltmeter have a Resistance (ohms - Ω) mode? We can use that function to determine the correct polarity of the wires, IF the PCB is not damaged.

With the batteries removed, check the resistance at the points indicated above (#1 & #2) by doing the following:

set your meter to the highest resistance selection, then put the POS (red) lead of the meter at point #1 and the NEG [Black] lead at #2. Note the meter's read-out (value A):

then reverse the meter's leads, noting the resistance read-out (value B).

There should be a significant difference between the two readings.

Please post your results.
 

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