Welcome to our site!

Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

  • Welcome to our site! Electro Tech is an online community (with over 170,000 members) who enjoy talking about and building electronic circuits, projects and gadgets. To participate you need to register. Registration is free. Click here to register now.

Regulator

Status
Not open for further replies.

sundar

New Member
1) in series and shunt voltage regulator what changes will take place inside the circuit if i increase
i)the supply voltage
ii)load current
so that i can get regulated output.
2) why sampling is connected to inverting terminal in series voltage regulator and the same is connected to non-inverting terminal in case of shunt-voltage regulator?
3) sampling is fed to one terminal and reference voltage(zener voltage) is fed to other ( pin 2 and 3).then, is the output will be a difference between these two?
 

Attachments

  • series voltage reg.doc
    24.5 KB · Views: 102
  • Shunt voltage regulator.doc
    27.5 KB · Views: 98

MikeMl

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
The shunt regulator is not a practical circuit. The series resistor (R6 10k) is much, much too high in value.

The series regulator is not a practical circuit either. The 741's output will not pull high enough to feed base current to the pass transistor.
 

Diver300

Well-Known Member
Most Helpful Member
2) why sampling is connected to inverting terminal in series voltage regulator and the same is connected to non-inverting terminal in case of shunt-voltage regulator?
3) sampling is fed to one terminal and reference voltage(zener voltage) is fed to other ( pin 2 and 3).then, is the output will be a difference between these two?

On point 2, when the output voltage is larger, the series regulator has to reduce the power to the transistor.

On a shunt regulator, when the output voltage is larger, it has to increase the power to the transistor.

That is why the op amps are connected opposite ways round.

On point 3, the op amp output is many times the difference between the two inputs (pin 2 and pin 3). The op amp will have a gain of a million or more, so in normal operation, pins 2 and 3 will be at the same voltage.

If pins 2 and 3 are not at the same voltage, the output of the op amp will be either maximum or minimum.
 

sundar

New Member
On a shunt regulator, when the output voltage is larger, it has to increase the power to the transistor.

That is why the op amps are connected opposite ways round.

On point 3, the op amp output is many times the difference between the two inputs (pin 2 and pin 3). The op amp will have a gain of a million or more, so in normal operation, pins 2 and 3 will be at the same voltage.

If pins 2 and 3 are not at the same voltage, the output of the op amp will be either maximum or minimum.[/QUOTE]


CAN YOU EXPLAIN IT IN A BETTER WAY?
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest threads

EE World Online Articles

Loading
Top