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proteus

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bilal142

New Member
hi

well i have problem in simulating the projects schematics, i want to know is there any difference between a 0.25watt and 10watt resistors, what ll b the effect of this?
and how can i get the resistor of 0.25watt value resistor.
 

Technogumbo

New Member
The difference between a .25watt and 10watt resistor is how many amps you plan to run through it at a certain voltage. The watt rating is basically telling you what kind of voltage and amperage the part will handle. Watts = Volts * amps

So for instance. A 10 watt resistor could be used in a circuit that has 1 amp going through it at 10V.

The .25watt resistor could only handle .025 amps (25mA) at 10V.
 

Boncuk

New Member
hi

well i have problem in simulating the projects schematics, i want to know is there any difference between a 0.25watt and 10watt resistors, what ll b the effect of this?
I didn't notice any effect till now. Just throw a glance at your monitor from time using a 0.6Watt resistor drawing overcurrent.

Might be the monitor will catch on fire. :D

Boncuk
 

Sceadwian

Banned
The wattage rating is how much power the resistor package itself can dissipate. The resistance value between a 100ohm 10watt and a 100ohm .25watt resistor is the same, however as the current increases the power that resistor dissipates will increase as well, a 10 watt resistor simply has a much larger physical bulk or is made from materials that will dissipate that heat better. If you go over the maximum wattage rating of a resistor it will begin to heat exponentially, this will effect the resistance both on the short term and if it's heated enough will permanently alter the resistance value, so it's very important to always chose a proper wattage rating for the resistors in a given circuit. Ambient temperature and how easy it is for the resistor package to actually emit the heat it's creating will effect the practical wattage of a resistor. A simple example being if you encapsulate a resistor in a bead of silicon the silicon will insulate the resistor and cause it to overheat MUCH faster than if the resistor were in contact with something like an aluminum heat sink. Even if the resistors were identical. It is an often overlooked facet of circuit construction because it's a material science problem not an electrical one.
 
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bilal142

New Member
helllo
thx u all of u.......
and kindly help me in an other matter, i have a prob that i m unable to distinguish between +ve and -ve terminals of capacitors in proteus.....
can u plz tell me which one is +ve......
shaded or the other
 

Sceadwian

Banned
You may be using a non-polarized cap, they don't have +ve -ve connections they can be hooked up either way.
 

bilal142

New Member
no sir those are the polar capacitors, in proteus thay have one shaded side and one empty, if u know do tell me
 

Sceadwian

Banned
No idea, don't use Proteus. I use free opensource software for simulation. You'd have to take a screen capture so we can see what you're talking about, very few people here use Proteus excepting school student. The software is just too expensive to justify for most people.
 

Sceadwian

Banned
ltspice for analog and simple digital circuits and whatever simulator is in the programming IDE that you use for your specific micro controller. Learning to not trust your own programming so much to the point you have to simulate your code before you run it in a circuit every single time is a crutch, unless you feel like dropping the cash on Proteus after you get out of school.
 
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